Wellbody Blog

At Professor Wellbody's Academy of Health & Wellness, we understand there's only one thing harder than making healthy behavior changes: Sticking to them! We all need a little help from our friends, and that's the purpose of the Wellbody Blog, a friendly online gathering spot--a community well--where you can dip into health news; wellness tips; recipes; latest research about nutrition, exercise, sleep and hygiene; plus, real stories from virtual neighbors who are also trying to change their lives for the better. Start from wherever you are; share ideas, information, inspiration. At Pacific Science Center, we believe each of us can do something everyday to improve our health and well-being.

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Recent blog posts

256px-Veggie burger miikkahoo flickr creative commonsNow that summer’s almost here, let’s talk burgers.

Mushroom and grain cheeseburgers. Sweet-potato burgers oozing with caramelized onions. Curried burgers with tangy yogurt and a zing of ginger. 

To be honest, we also love juicy beef burgers sizzled on the grill until they’re charred and smoky to the bite. Trouble is, seared meat causes cancer. Scientists have known about the link between dangerous heterocyclic amines (HCAs) and grilled meats for a few years. But recently, to add fuel to the fire, new studies show that diets high in animal proteins, no matter how the animal protein is cooked, also significantly increase cancer risk.

(Keep reading for luscious healthy burger recipes and "Better Burger" contest info!)

Photo by Miikkahoo

Alexis with Valerian

Ginger. Cinnamon. Garlic. Turmeric

This week on Wellody Blog,  Alexis Durham, herbalist and instructor at Bastyr University, shares tips on using common kitchen herbs to improve health.

Alexis Durham is an herbalist and instructor at Bastyr University, and is currently the Program Director for the Certificate in Holistic Landscape Design. She teaches classes on herbs and food, herbal medicine making, and landscaping with medicinal and edible plants throughout the community. Her next public speaking engagement is at Bastyr University’s Herb and Food Fair on May 31.

Keep reading to learn the health benefits of ginger, garlic, turmeric and cinnamon and how to incorporate them into your everyday diet. 

BoaEstebanOne of our boa constrictors, Esteban, has embarked on a new exercise regimen despite and because of arthritis.

Naturally, our ache-y snake is not crazy about working out with a sore back (talk about a looooong stack of creaky vertebrae!), but SlitherFit has definitely helped his strength, flexibility and stamina.

Keep reading to learn more about Esteban’s arthritis treatment,  watch a video of our boa constrictors' out-of-cage strengthening and conditioning routine, and learn important reasons why humans with disabilities or injuries should exercise. 

spring toothbrush200

Our friends, the industrious naked mole rats, are scrupulous about their dental routine. That's because their continuously growing incisors need to be frequently filed down with something hard like concrete blocks.

We humans turn to toothbrushes and floss for our oral hygiene needs. And since it's spring, how about taking a few minutes to spring clean and refresh your smile?

Here's a checklist to get you started. 

 1. Out with the old, in with the new. When was the last time you replaced your toothbrush? It’s important to replace old toothbrush heads or toothbrushes every three to four months. As bristles wear, they become less effective at reaching all the little nooks and crannies that need to be cleaned. Most toothbrushes have an indicator that starts to fade on the bristles when it’s time to replace. If not, set up an alert on your phone or write it on the calendar so you’ll remember when to replace the old toothbrush.

(Keep reading for dental dance tips!) 

GermanSpaTown200

 Are you a morning person? A night owl?

Your preferred sleep pattern is called your “chronotype,” and if you’re forcing yourself to live outside your natural circadian pattern—a night owl jarred awake early by an alarm clock, for example, or an early bird who stays up late working or partying—it’s not just a matter of feeling tired. You’re at risk for depression, poor memory, obesity and even some kinds of cancer. But the demands of work, school and society—and the convenience of artificial lighting—make it hard for many people to listen to their own body clocks.

Unless, that is, they live in Bad Kissingen, a small spa town on the southern edge of Germany’s Rhön Mountains. (Bad means “bath” in German.)