PacSci-Doku | Pacific Science Center https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org Sat, 17 Feb 2018 08:01:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/pacsci-site-icon-320x320-150x150.jpg PacSci-Doku | Pacific Science Center https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org 32 32 PacSci-Doku: “First Life On Earth” https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/pacsci-doku/first-life-on-earth/ Mon, 29 Jan 2018 14:15:19 +0000 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/?p=22307 PacSci-Doku: "First Life On Earth"

[et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" fullwidth="on" specialty="off" background_image="https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/header-blue-synapses-1280x292.jpg" transparent_background="off" allow_player_pause="off" inner_shadow="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" padding_mobile="off" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" make_equal="off" use_custom_gutter="off" background_color="#ffffff" disabled="off" disabled_on="off|off|off" custom_padding_tablet="50px|0|50px|0" custom_padding_last_edited="on|desktop" global_module="6681"][et_pb_fullwidth_header global_parent="6681" title="Pacific Science Center" subhead="Bringing science to life." background_layout="dark" text_orientation="left" header_fullscreen="off" header_scroll_down="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" content_orientation="center" image_orientation="center" custom_button_one="off" button_one_letter_spacing="0" button_one_use_icon="default" button_one_icon_placement="right" button_one_on_hover="on" button_one_letter_spacing_hover="0" custom_button_two="off" button_two_letter_spacing="0" button_two_use_icon="default" button_two_icon_placement="right" button_two_on_hover="on" button_two_letter_spacing_hover="0" /][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section"][et_pb_row admin_label="row" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][et_pb_text admin_label="Text Module - Opening Text - Edit ONLY The Title" background_layout="light" _builder_version="3.0.98"]

PacSci-Doku: "First Life On Earth"

By Dennis Schatz - Senior Advisor

Do you Sudoku? It's one of the hottest number games around! Well, here's a twist we think you'll love. We call it PacSci-Doku. Can you guess why? Here's how it works. Instead of filling in the blanks with numbers, we use letters. Hidden in one of the columns or rows is the answer to a science question. You'll find information about the answer on the answer tab below.

The question in this edition is:

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Text Module - The Puzzle" background_layout="light" _builder_version="3.0.98"]

What discovery may show that life existed earlier on Earth than we thought?

To find the answer, complete this PacSci-Doku using the following nine letters:

E  e  A  T  X  P  H  C  R

[caption id="attachment_22306" align="alignnone" width="450"]PacSci-Doku: "First Life On Earth" The Puzzle[/caption]

Puzzle Difficulty: Easy

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_toggle admin_label="Toggle - The Answer" title="The Answer" open="off" _builder_version="3.0.98"]

[caption id="attachment_22305" align="alignright" width="300"]PacSci-Doku: "First Life On Earth" Answer The Answer[/caption]

The question in this edition is:

What discovery may show that life existed earlier on Earth than we thought?

The answer: Apex Chert

Northwest Australia contains the oldest rocks known on Earth. Among these rocks is the Apex Chert. This rock deposit contains microscopic tubes that some scientists think are evidence of life existing on Earth 3.5 billion years ago. Other recent discoveries point to the possibility that life existed on Earth even earlier - up to 4.3 billion years ago. Given that the Earth only cooled 4.4 billion years ago to the point that rocks could solidify, this means life developed on Earth much earlier than previously thought. Read more about these possible discoveries of ancient life.

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The post PacSci-Doku: “First Life On Earth” appeared first on Pacific Science Center.

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[et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" fullwidth="on" specialty="off" background_image="https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/header-blue-synapses-1280x292.jpg" transparent_background="off" allow_player_pause="off" inner_shadow="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" padding_mobile="off" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" make_equal="off" use_custom_gutter="off" background_color="#ffffff" disabled="off" disabled_on="off|off|off" custom_padding_tablet="50px|0|50px|0" custom_padding_last_edited="on|desktop" global_module="6681"][et_pb_fullwidth_header global_parent="6681" title="Pacific Science Center" subhead="Bringing science to life." background_layout="dark" text_orientation="left" header_fullscreen="off" header_scroll_down="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" content_orientation="center" image_orientation="center" custom_button_one="off" button_one_letter_spacing="0" button_one_use_icon="default" button_one_icon_placement="right" button_one_on_hover="on" button_one_letter_spacing_hover="0" custom_button_two="off" button_two_letter_spacing="0" button_two_use_icon="default" button_two_icon_placement="right" button_two_on_hover="on" button_two_letter_spacing_hover="0" /][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section"][et_pb_row admin_label="row" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][et_pb_text admin_label="Text Module - Opening Text - Edit ONLY The Title" background_layout="light" _builder_version="3.0.98"]

PacSci-Doku: "First Life On Earth"

By Dennis Schatz - Senior Advisor Do you Sudoku? It's one of the hottest number games around! Well, here's a twist we think you'll love. We call it PacSci-Doku. Can you guess why? Here's how it works. Instead of filling in the blanks with numbers, we use letters. Hidden in one of the columns or rows is the answer to a science question. You'll find information about the answer on the answer tab below. The question in this edition is: [/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Text Module - The Puzzle" background_layout="light" _builder_version="3.0.98"] What discovery may show that life existed earlier on Earth than we thought? To find the answer, complete this PacSci-Doku using the following nine letters: E  e  A  T  X  P  H  C  R [caption id="attachment_22306" align="alignnone" width="450"]PacSci-Doku: "First Life On Earth" The Puzzle[/caption] Puzzle Difficulty: Easy [/et_pb_text][et_pb_toggle admin_label="Toggle - The Answer" title="The Answer" open="off" _builder_version="3.0.98"] [caption id="attachment_22305" align="alignright" width="300"]PacSci-Doku: "First Life On Earth" Answer The Answer[/caption] The question in this edition is: What discovery may show that life existed earlier on Earth than we thought? The answer: Apex Chert Northwest Australia contains the oldest rocks known on Earth. Among these rocks is the Apex Chert. This rock deposit contains microscopic tubes that some scientists think are evidence of life existing on Earth 3.5 billion years ago. Other recent discoveries point to the possibility that life existed on Earth even earlier - up to 4.3 billion years ago. Given that the Earth only cooled 4.4 billion years ago to the point that rocks could solidify, this means life developed on Earth much earlier than previously thought. Read more about these possible discoveries of ancient life. [/et_pb_toggle][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

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PacSci-Docku: “Skin Condition” https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/pacsci-doku/skin-condition/ Wed, 20 Dec 2017 01:14:39 +0000 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/?p=21377 PacSci-Doku: "Skin Condition"

[et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" fullwidth="on" specialty="off" background_image="https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/header-blue-synapses-1280x292.jpg" transparent_background="off" allow_player_pause="off" inner_shadow="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" padding_mobile="off" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" make_equal="off" use_custom_gutter="off" background_color="#ffffff" disabled="off" disabled_on="off|off|off" custom_padding_tablet="50px|0|50px|0" custom_padding_last_edited="on|desktop" global_module="6681"][et_pb_fullwidth_header global_parent="6681" title="Pacific Science Center" subhead="Bringing science to life." background_layout="dark" text_orientation="left" header_fullscreen="off" header_scroll_down="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" content_orientation="center" image_orientation="center" custom_button_one="off" button_one_letter_spacing="0" button_one_use_icon="default" button_one_icon_placement="right" button_one_on_hover="on" button_one_letter_spacing_hover="0" custom_button_two="off" button_two_letter_spacing="0" button_two_use_icon="default" button_two_icon_placement="right" button_two_on_hover="on" button_two_letter_spacing_hover="0" /][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section"][et_pb_row admin_label="row" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][et_pb_text admin_label="Text Module - Opening Text - Edit ONLY The Title" background_layout="light" _builder_version="3.0.92"]

PacSci-Doku: "Skin Condition"

By Dennis Schatz - Senior Advisor

Do you Sudoku? It's one of the hottest number games around! Well, here's a twist we think you'll love. We call it PacSci-Doku. Can you guess why? Here's how it works. Instead of filling in the blanks with numbers, we use letters. Hidden in one of the columns or rows is the answer to a science question. You'll find information about the answer on the answer tab below.

The question in this edition is:

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Text Module - The Puzzle" background_layout="light" _builder_version="3.0.92"]

What appears to be the goal of bowhead whales when they rub against underwater rocks?

To find the answer, complete this PacSci-Doku using the following nine letters:

O  I  E  e  A  X  T  F  L

[caption id="attachment_21374" align="alignnone" width="450"]PacSci-Doku: "Skin Condition" The Puzzle[/caption]

Puzzle Difficulty: Hard

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_toggle admin_label="Toggle - The Answer" title="The Answer" open="off" _builder_version="3.0.92"]

[caption id="attachment_21373" align="alignright" width="300"]PacSci-Doku: "Skin Condition" Answer The Answer[/caption]

The question in this edition is:

What appears to be the goal of bowhead whales when they rub against underwater rocks?

The answer: Exfoliate

In 2014, scientist Sarah Fortune observed bowhead whales rubbing up against underwater boulders. This was dislodging the radio tags she placed on the whales. In addition, large pieces of skin were coming off as the whales rubbed against the rocks. Further studies showed the whales used the rocks to exfoliate their skin, just as humans use pumice stones to eliminate dead skin on our feet. Watch bowhead whales as they rub against rocks to rid themselves of dead and molting skin.

[/et_pb_toggle][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

The post PacSci-Docku: “Skin Condition” appeared first on Pacific Science Center.

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PacSci-Doku: "Skin Condition"

By Dennis Schatz - Senior Advisor Do you Sudoku? It's one of the hottest number games around! Well, here's a twist we think you'll love. We call it PacSci-Doku. Can you guess why? Here's how it works. Instead of filling in the blanks with numbers, we use letters. Hidden in one of the columns or rows is the answer to a science question. You'll find information about the answer on the answer tab below. The question in this edition is: [/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Text Module - The Puzzle" background_layout="light" _builder_version="3.0.92"] What appears to be the goal of bowhead whales when they rub against underwater rocks? To find the answer, complete this PacSci-Doku using the following nine letters: O  I  E  e  A  X  T  F  L [caption id="attachment_21374" align="alignnone" width="450"]PacSci-Doku: "Skin Condition" The Puzzle[/caption] Puzzle Difficulty: Hard [/et_pb_text][et_pb_toggle admin_label="Toggle - The Answer" title="The Answer" open="off" _builder_version="3.0.92"] [caption id="attachment_21373" align="alignright" width="300"]PacSci-Doku: "Skin Condition" Answer The Answer[/caption] The question in this edition is: What appears to be the goal of bowhead whales when they rub against underwater rocks? The answer: Exfoliate In 2014, scientist Sarah Fortune observed bowhead whales rubbing up against underwater boulders. This was dislodging the radio tags she placed on the whales. In addition, large pieces of skin were coming off as the whales rubbed against the rocks. Further studies showed the whales used the rocks to exfoliate their skin, just as humans use pumice stones to eliminate dead skin on our feet. Watch bowhead whales as they rub against rocks to rid themselves of dead and molting skin. [/et_pb_toggle][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

The post PacSci-Docku: “Skin Condition” appeared first on Pacific Science Center.

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PacSci-Doku: “Amazon Adventure” https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/pacsci-doku/amazon-adventure-2017-11-06/ Tue, 07 Nov 2017 03:24:50 +0000 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/?p=20358 PacSci-Doku: "Amazon Adventure" The Puzzle

[et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" fullwidth="on" specialty="off" background_image="https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/header-blue-synapses-1280x292.jpg" transparent_background="off" allow_player_pause="off" inner_shadow="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" padding_mobile="off" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" make_equal="off" use_custom_gutter="off" background_color="#ffffff" disabled="off" disabled_on="off|off|off" global_module="6681" custom_padding_tablet="50px|0|50px|0" custom_padding_last_edited="on|desktop"][et_pb_fullwidth_header global_parent="6681" title="Pacific Science Center" subhead="Bringing science to life." background_layout="dark" text_orientation="left" header_fullscreen="off" header_scroll_down="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" content_orientation="center" image_orientation="center" custom_button_one="off" button_one_letter_spacing="0" button_one_use_icon="default" button_one_icon_placement="right" button_one_on_hover="on" button_one_letter_spacing_hover="0" custom_button_two="off" button_two_letter_spacing="0" button_two_use_icon="default" button_two_icon_placement="right" button_two_on_hover="on" button_two_letter_spacing_hover="0" /][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" background_color="#ffffff" custom_padding_tablet="50px|0|50px|0" custom_padding_last_edited="on|desktop"][et_pb_row admin_label="row"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][et_pb_text admin_label="Text Module - Opening Text - Edit ONLY The Title" background_layout="light" _builder_version="3.0.86"]

PacSci-Doku: "Amazon Adventure"

By Dennis Schatz - Senior Advisor

Do you Sudoku? It's one of the hottest number games around! Well, here's a twist we think you'll love. We call it PacSci-Doku. Can you guess why? Here's how it works. Instead of filling in the blanks with numbers, we use letters. Hidden in one of the columns or rows is the answer to a science question. You'll find information about the answer on the answer tab below.

The question in this edition is:

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Text Module - The Puzzle" background_layout="light" _builder_version="3.0.86"]

What fundamental principle of science is featured in the Amazon Adventure IMAX movie?

To find the answer, complete this PacSci-Doku using the following nine letters:

U  E  O  o  i  N  V  T  L

[caption id="attachment_20355" align="alignnone" width="450"]PacSci-Doku: "Amazon Adventure" The Puzzle The Puzzle[/caption]

Puzzle Difficulty: Medium

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_toggle admin_label="Toggle - The Answer" title="The Answer" open="off" _builder_version="3.0.89"]

[caption id="attachment_20354" align="alignright" width="300"]PacSci-Doku: "Amazon Adventure" The Answer The Answer[/caption]

The question in this edition is:

What fundamental principle of science is featured in the Amazon Adventure IMAX movie?

The answer: Evolution

Henry Bates is the scientist featured in the new IMAX movie, Amazon Adventure. The son of sock makers, he left home at 23 to explore the Amazon rainforests. His goal was to find evidence that supported Darwin's theory of evolution. Bates spent 11 years in the Amazon, discovered 8,000 new species, and discovered the phenomenon of mimicry - where a toxic animal is mimicked by a non-toxic animal in order to scare away predators. Read more about the amazing adventures of Henry Bates and his contribution to the theory of evolution.

 

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The post PacSci-Doku: “Amazon Adventure” appeared first on Pacific Science Center.

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[et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" fullwidth="on" specialty="off" background_image="https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/header-blue-synapses-1280x292.jpg" transparent_background="off" allow_player_pause="off" inner_shadow="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" padding_mobile="off" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" make_equal="off" use_custom_gutter="off" background_color="#ffffff" disabled="off" disabled_on="off|off|off" global_module="6681" custom_padding_tablet="50px|0|50px|0" custom_padding_last_edited="on|desktop"][et_pb_fullwidth_header global_parent="6681" title="Pacific Science Center" subhead="Bringing science to life." background_layout="dark" text_orientation="left" header_fullscreen="off" header_scroll_down="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" content_orientation="center" image_orientation="center" custom_button_one="off" button_one_letter_spacing="0" button_one_use_icon="default" button_one_icon_placement="right" button_one_on_hover="on" button_one_letter_spacing_hover="0" custom_button_two="off" button_two_letter_spacing="0" button_two_use_icon="default" button_two_icon_placement="right" button_two_on_hover="on" button_two_letter_spacing_hover="0" /][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" background_color="#ffffff" custom_padding_tablet="50px|0|50px|0" custom_padding_last_edited="on|desktop"][et_pb_row admin_label="row"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][et_pb_text admin_label="Text Module - Opening Text - Edit ONLY The Title" background_layout="light" _builder_version="3.0.86"]

PacSci-Doku: "Amazon Adventure"

By Dennis Schatz - Senior Advisor Do you Sudoku? It's one of the hottest number games around! Well, here's a twist we think you'll love. We call it PacSci-Doku. Can you guess why? Here's how it works. Instead of filling in the blanks with numbers, we use letters. Hidden in one of the columns or rows is the answer to a science question. You'll find information about the answer on the answer tab below. The question in this edition is: [/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Text Module - The Puzzle" background_layout="light" _builder_version="3.0.86"] What fundamental principle of science is featured in the Amazon Adventure IMAX movie? To find the answer, complete this PacSci-Doku using the following nine letters: U  E  O  o  i  N  V  T  L [caption id="attachment_20355" align="alignnone" width="450"]PacSci-Doku: "Amazon Adventure" The Puzzle The Puzzle[/caption] Puzzle Difficulty: Medium [/et_pb_text][et_pb_toggle admin_label="Toggle - The Answer" title="The Answer" open="off" _builder_version="3.0.89"] [caption id="attachment_20354" align="alignright" width="300"]PacSci-Doku: "Amazon Adventure" The Answer The Answer[/caption] The question in this edition is: What fundamental principle of science is featured in the Amazon Adventure IMAX movie? The answer: Evolution Henry Bates is the scientist featured in the new IMAX movie, Amazon Adventure. The son of sock makers, he left home at 23 to explore the Amazon rainforests. His goal was to find evidence that supported Darwin's theory of evolution. Bates spent 11 years in the Amazon, discovered 8,000 new species, and discovered the phenomenon of mimicry - where a toxic animal is mimicked by a non-toxic animal in order to scare away predators. Read more about the amazing adventures of Henry Bates and his contribution to the theory of evolution.   [/et_pb_toggle][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

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PacSci-Doku: “National Reserve” https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/pacsci-doku/national-reserve/ Mon, 16 Oct 2017 18:00:56 +0000 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/?p=19769 PacSci-Doku: National Reserve

[et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" fullwidth="on" specialty="off" background_image="https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/header-blue-synapses-1280x292.jpg" transparent_background="off" allow_player_pause="off" inner_shadow="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" padding_mobile="off" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" make_equal="off" use_custom_gutter="off" background_color="#ffffff" disabled="off" disabled_on="off|off|off" global_module="6681"][et_pb_fullwidth_header global_parent="6681" title="Pacific Science Center" subhead="Bringing science to life." background_layout="dark" text_orientation="left" header_fullscreen="off" header_scroll_down="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" content_orientation="center" image_orientation="center" custom_button_one="off" button_one_letter_spacing="0" button_one_use_icon="default" button_one_icon_placement="right" button_one_on_hover="on" button_one_letter_spacing_hover="0" custom_button_two="off" button_two_letter_spacing="0" button_two_use_icon="default" button_two_icon_placement="right" button_two_on_hover="on" button_two_letter_spacing_hover="0" /][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section"][et_pb_row admin_label="row"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][et_pb_text admin_label="Text Module - Opening Text - Edit ONLY The Title" background_layout="light" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.82" box_shadow_position="outer"]

PacSci-Doku: "National Reserve"

By Dennis Schatz - Senior Advisor

Do you Sudoku? It's one of the hottest number games around! Well, here's a twist we think you'll love. We call it PacSci-Doku. Can you guess why? Here's how it works. Instead of filling in the blanks with numbers, we use letters. Hidden in one of the columns or rows is the answer to a science question. You'll find information about the answer on the answer tab below.

The question in this edition is:

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Text Module - The Puzzle" background_layout="light" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.82" box_shadow_position="outer"]

What could be the newest national reserve in the United States?

To find the answer, complete this PacSci-Doku using the following nine letters:

E  A  I  S  s  K  k  R  D

[caption id="attachment_19766" align="alignnone" width="450"]PacSci-Doku: National Reserve The Puzzle[/caption]

Puzzle Difficulty: Easy

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_toggle admin_label="Toggle - The Answer" title="The Answer" open="off" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.82" box_shadow_position="outer"]

[caption id="attachment_19765" align="alignright" width="300"]PacSci-Doku: National Reserve The Answer[/caption]

The question in this edition is:

What could be the newest national reserve in the United States?

The answer: Dark Skies

The United States has national marine reserves, bird sanctuaries, and botanical reserves. If astronomy enthusiasts have their way, the next reserve will be the Idaho Dark Sky Reserve, consisting of 900,000 acres in central Idaho. Light pollution across the United States, from streetlights, houselights, security lights, lit-up buildings and advertisement signs, means that most people can only see the brightest stars in the night sky. Almost 80% of people in North America cannot see the beautiful Milky Way stretching across the sky on a clear night. They cannot see the many faint gaseous nebula (like the Orion Nebula), and distant galaxies (like the Andromeda Galaxy) located across the night sky. The Dark Sky Reserve will guarantee that at least one place in the United States will have dark skies, no matter how much human develop occurs in the future. Read more about the Idaho Dark Sky Reserve and see images of the Milky Way from a light polluted area versus a dark sky location.

 

 

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[et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" fullwidth="on" specialty="off" background_image="https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/header-blue-synapses-1280x292.jpg" transparent_background="off" allow_player_pause="off" inner_shadow="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" padding_mobile="off" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" make_equal="off" use_custom_gutter="off" background_color="#ffffff" disabled="off" disabled_on="off|off|off" global_module="6681"][et_pb_fullwidth_header global_parent="6681" title="Pacific Science Center" subhead="Bringing science to life." background_layout="dark" text_orientation="left" header_fullscreen="off" header_scroll_down="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" content_orientation="center" image_orientation="center" custom_button_one="off" button_one_letter_spacing="0" button_one_use_icon="default" button_one_icon_placement="right" button_one_on_hover="on" button_one_letter_spacing_hover="0" custom_button_two="off" button_two_letter_spacing="0" button_two_use_icon="default" button_two_icon_placement="right" button_two_on_hover="on" button_two_letter_spacing_hover="0" /][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section"][et_pb_row admin_label="row"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][et_pb_text admin_label="Text Module - Opening Text - Edit ONLY The Title" background_layout="light" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.82" box_shadow_position="outer"]

PacSci-Doku: "National Reserve"

By Dennis Schatz - Senior Advisor Do you Sudoku? It's one of the hottest number games around! Well, here's a twist we think you'll love. We call it PacSci-Doku. Can you guess why? Here's how it works. Instead of filling in the blanks with numbers, we use letters. Hidden in one of the columns or rows is the answer to a science question. You'll find information about the answer on the answer tab below. The question in this edition is: [/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Text Module - The Puzzle" background_layout="light" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.82" box_shadow_position="outer"] What could be the newest national reserve in the United States? To find the answer, complete this PacSci-Doku using the following nine letters: E  A  I  S  s  K  k  R  D [caption id="attachment_19766" align="alignnone" width="450"]PacSci-Doku: National Reserve The Puzzle[/caption] Puzzle Difficulty: Easy [/et_pb_text][et_pb_toggle admin_label="Toggle - The Answer" title="The Answer" open="off" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.82" box_shadow_position="outer"] [caption id="attachment_19765" align="alignright" width="300"]PacSci-Doku: National Reserve The Answer[/caption] The question in this edition is: What could be the newest national reserve in the United States? The answer: Dark Skies The United States has national marine reserves, bird sanctuaries, and botanical reserves. If astronomy enthusiasts have their way, the next reserve will be the Idaho Dark Sky Reserve, consisting of 900,000 acres in central Idaho. Light pollution across the United States, from streetlights, houselights, security lights, lit-up buildings and advertisement signs, means that most people can only see the brightest stars in the night sky. Almost 80% of people in North America cannot see the beautiful Milky Way stretching across the sky on a clear night. They cannot see the many faint gaseous nebula (like the Orion Nebula), and distant galaxies (like the Andromeda Galaxy) located across the night sky. The Dark Sky Reserve will guarantee that at least one place in the United States will have dark skies, no matter how much human develop occurs in the future. Read more about the Idaho Dark Sky Reserve and see images of the Milky Way from a light polluted area versus a dark sky location.     [/et_pb_toggle][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

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PacSci-Doku: “Ancient Glue” https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/pacsci-doku/ancient-glue/ Tue, 19 Sep 2017 16:32:59 +0000 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/?p=19022 PacSci-Doku: Ancient Glue

[et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" fullwidth="on" specialty="off" background_image="https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/header-blue-synapses-1280x292.jpg" transparent_background="off" allow_player_pause="off" inner_shadow="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" padding_mobile="off" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" make_equal="off" use_custom_gutter="off" background_color="#ffffff" disabled="off" disabled_on="off|off|off" global_module="6681"][et_pb_fullwidth_header global_parent="6681" title="Pacific Science Center" subhead="Bringing science to life." background_layout="dark" text_orientation="left" header_fullscreen="off" header_scroll_down="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" content_orientation="center" image_orientation="center" custom_button_one="off" button_one_letter_spacing="0" button_one_use_icon="default" button_one_icon_placement="right" button_one_on_hover="on" button_one_letter_spacing_hover="0" custom_button_two="off" button_two_letter_spacing="0" button_two_use_icon="default" button_two_icon_placement="right" button_two_on_hover="on" button_two_letter_spacing_hover="0" /][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section"][et_pb_row admin_label="row"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][et_pb_text admin_label="Text Module - Opening Text - Edit ONLY The Title" background_layout="light" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.75"]

PacSci-Doku: "Ancient Glue"

By Dennis Schatz - Senior Advisor

Do you Sudoku? It's one of the hottest number games around! Well, here's a twist we think you'll love. We call it PacSci-Doku. Can you guess why? Here's how it works. Instead of filling in the blanks with numbers, we use letters. Hidden in one of the columns or rows is the answer to a science question. You'll find information about the answer on the answer tab below.

The question in this edition is:

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Text Module - The Puzzle" background_layout="light" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.75"]

What was one of the possible methods that Neanderthals used to produce the first glue?

To find the answer, complete this PacSci-Doku using the following nine letters:

U  A  O  D  _  S  N  H  M

[caption id="attachment_19019" align="alignnone" width="450"]PacSci-Doku: Ancient Glue The Puzzle[/caption]

Puzzle Difficulty: Medium

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_toggle admin_label="Toggle - The Answer" title="The Answer" open="off" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.75"]

[caption id="attachment_19018" align="alignright" width="300"]PacSci-Doku: Ancient Glue Answer The Answer[/caption]

The question in this edition is:

What was one of the possible methods that Neanderthals used to produce the first glue?

The answer: Ash Mound

Neanderthals are often described as less intelligent than modern humans. But the image of Neanderthals is slowly changing. One piece of evidence for this is that they produced the first glue made by humans to hold together their weapons. The glue had the constancy of tar. A key question has been how did they produce the glue. One possible method is the Ash Mound method. The process consisted of rolling up a piece of birch bark, and covering it with ash and hot embers from a fire. After 20 minutes, small drops of tar were found when unrolling the bark. See how the glue was used and read more about Neanderthals production of the first glue.

 

 

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[et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" fullwidth="on" specialty="off" background_image="https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/header-blue-synapses-1280x292.jpg" transparent_background="off" allow_player_pause="off" inner_shadow="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" padding_mobile="off" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" make_equal="off" use_custom_gutter="off" background_color="#ffffff" disabled="off" disabled_on="off|off|off" global_module="6681"][et_pb_fullwidth_header global_parent="6681" title="Pacific Science Center" subhead="Bringing science to life." background_layout="dark" text_orientation="left" header_fullscreen="off" header_scroll_down="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" content_orientation="center" image_orientation="center" custom_button_one="off" button_one_letter_spacing="0" button_one_use_icon="default" button_one_icon_placement="right" button_one_on_hover="on" button_one_letter_spacing_hover="0" custom_button_two="off" button_two_letter_spacing="0" button_two_use_icon="default" button_two_icon_placement="right" button_two_on_hover="on" button_two_letter_spacing_hover="0" /][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section"][et_pb_row admin_label="row"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][et_pb_text admin_label="Text Module - Opening Text - Edit ONLY The Title" background_layout="light" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.75"]

PacSci-Doku: "Ancient Glue"

By Dennis Schatz - Senior Advisor Do you Sudoku? It's one of the hottest number games around! Well, here's a twist we think you'll love. We call it PacSci-Doku. Can you guess why? Here's how it works. Instead of filling in the blanks with numbers, we use letters. Hidden in one of the columns or rows is the answer to a science question. You'll find information about the answer on the answer tab below. The question in this edition is: [/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Text Module - The Puzzle" background_layout="light" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.75"] What was one of the possible methods that Neanderthals used to produce the first glue? To find the answer, complete this PacSci-Doku using the following nine letters: U  A  O  D  _  S  N  H  M [caption id="attachment_19019" align="alignnone" width="450"]PacSci-Doku: Ancient Glue The Puzzle[/caption] Puzzle Difficulty: Medium [/et_pb_text][et_pb_toggle admin_label="Toggle - The Answer" title="The Answer" open="off" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.75"] [caption id="attachment_19018" align="alignright" width="300"]PacSci-Doku: Ancient Glue Answer The Answer[/caption] The question in this edition is: What was one of the possible methods that Neanderthals used to produce the first glue? The answer: Ash Mound Neanderthals are often described as less intelligent than modern humans. But the image of Neanderthals is slowly changing. One piece of evidence for this is that they produced the first glue made by humans to hold together their weapons. The glue had the constancy of tar. A key question has been how did they produce the glue. One possible method is the Ash Mound method. The process consisted of rolling up a piece of birch bark, and covering it with ash and hot embers from a fire. After 20 minutes, small drops of tar were found when unrolling the bark. See how the glue was used and read more about Neanderthals production of the first glue.     [/et_pb_toggle][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

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PacSci-Doku: “Extinction Survivor” https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/pacsci-doku/extinction-survivor/ Sun, 13 Aug 2017 14:41:15 +0000 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/?p=18115 PacSci-Doku: Extinction Survivor

[et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" fullwidth="on" specialty="off" background_image="https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/header-blue-synapses-1280x292.jpg" transparent_background="off" allow_player_pause="off" inner_shadow="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" padding_mobile="off" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" make_equal="off" use_custom_gutter="off" background_color="#ffffff" disabled="off" disabled_on="off|off|off" global_module="6681"][et_pb_fullwidth_header global_parent="6681" title="Pacific Science Center" subhead="Bringing science to life." background_layout="dark" text_orientation="left" header_fullscreen="off" header_scroll_down="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" content_orientation="center" image_orientation="center" custom_button_one="off" button_one_letter_spacing="0" button_one_use_icon="default" button_one_icon_placement="right" button_one_on_hover="on" button_one_letter_spacing_hover="0" custom_button_two="off" button_two_letter_spacing="0" button_two_use_icon="default" button_two_icon_placement="right" button_two_on_hover="on" button_two_letter_spacing_hover="0" /][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section"][et_pb_row admin_label="row"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][et_pb_text admin_label="Text Module - Opening Text - Edit ONLY The Title" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.69"]

PacSci-Doku: "Extinction Survivor"

By Dennis Schatz - Senior Advisor

Do you Sudoku? It's one of the hottest number games around! Well, here's a twist we think you'll love. We call it PacSci-Doku. Can you guess why? Here's how it works. Instead of filling in the blanks with numbers, we use letters. Hidden in one of the columns or rows is the answer to a science question. You'll find information about the answer on the answer tab below.

The question in this edition is:

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Text Module - The Puzzle" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.69"]

What animal should survive the next extinction event on the Earth?

To find the answer, complete this PacSci-Doku using the following nine letters:

E  e  A  a  b  W  T  R  r

[caption id="attachment_18112" align="alignnone" width="450"]PacSci-Doku: Extinction Survivor The Puzzle[/caption]

Puzzle Difficulty: Hard

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_toggle admin_label="Toggle - The Answer" title="The Answer" open="off" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.69"]

[caption id="attachment_18111" align="alignright" width="300"]PacSci-Doku Extinction Survivor Answer The Answer[/caption]

The question in this edition is:

What animal should survive the next extinction event on the Earth?

The answer: Water Bear

Water Bears are one example of an animal group called tardigrades. These extremely small animals (0.01 mm to 1.5 mm in size), existed well before the dinosaurs – and still exist today. They are best known for being able to survive in the most extreme environments. Some tardigrades have survived for days in the vacuum and radiation of space. Others survived in temperatures close to absolute zero (minus 273 degrees centigrade), and many can survive the loss of almost all body water – going into dormancy for 30 years and then "waking up."

Consequently, scientists think that many of these animals can exist through any type of extinction event, and be around until the end of the Earth in billions of years when the outer layers of the Sun expand to envelop the Earth. Read more about these tough little animals.

.

 

 

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[et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" fullwidth="on" specialty="off" background_image="https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/header-blue-synapses-1280x292.jpg" transparent_background="off" allow_player_pause="off" inner_shadow="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" padding_mobile="off" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" make_equal="off" use_custom_gutter="off" background_color="#ffffff" disabled="off" disabled_on="off|off|off" global_module="6681"][et_pb_fullwidth_header global_parent="6681" title="Pacific Science Center" subhead="Bringing science to life." background_layout="dark" text_orientation="left" header_fullscreen="off" header_scroll_down="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" content_orientation="center" image_orientation="center" custom_button_one="off" button_one_letter_spacing="0" button_one_use_icon="default" button_one_icon_placement="right" button_one_on_hover="on" button_one_letter_spacing_hover="0" custom_button_two="off" button_two_letter_spacing="0" button_two_use_icon="default" button_two_icon_placement="right" button_two_on_hover="on" button_two_letter_spacing_hover="0" /][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section"][et_pb_row admin_label="row"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][et_pb_text admin_label="Text Module - Opening Text - Edit ONLY The Title" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.69"]

PacSci-Doku: "Extinction Survivor"

By Dennis Schatz - Senior Advisor Do you Sudoku? It's one of the hottest number games around! Well, here's a twist we think you'll love. We call it PacSci-Doku. Can you guess why? Here's how it works. Instead of filling in the blanks with numbers, we use letters. Hidden in one of the columns or rows is the answer to a science question. You'll find information about the answer on the answer tab below. The question in this edition is: [/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Text Module - The Puzzle" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.69"] What animal should survive the next extinction event on the Earth? To find the answer, complete this PacSci-Doku using the following nine letters: E  e  A  a  b  W  T  R  r [caption id="attachment_18112" align="alignnone" width="450"]PacSci-Doku: Extinction Survivor The Puzzle[/caption] Puzzle Difficulty: Hard [/et_pb_text][et_pb_toggle admin_label="Toggle - The Answer" title="The Answer" open="off" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.69"] [caption id="attachment_18111" align="alignright" width="300"]PacSci-Doku Extinction Survivor Answer The Answer[/caption] The question in this edition is: What animal should survive the next extinction event on the Earth? The answer: Water Bear Water Bears are one example of an animal group called tardigrades. These extremely small animals (0.01 mm to 1.5 mm in size), existed well before the dinosaurs – and still exist today. They are best known for being able to survive in the most extreme environments. Some tardigrades have survived for days in the vacuum and radiation of space. Others survived in temperatures close to absolute zero (minus 273 degrees centigrade), and many can survive the loss of almost all body water – going into dormancy for 30 years and then "waking up." Consequently, scientists think that many of these animals can exist through any type of extinction event, and be around until the end of the Earth in billions of years when the outer layers of the Sun expand to envelop the Earth. Read more about these tough little animals. .     [/et_pb_toggle][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

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PacSci-Doku: “Partial Eclipse Only” https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/pacsci-doku/partial-eclipse-only/ Fri, 14 Jul 2017 01:02:04 +0000 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/?p=17466 PacSci-Doku Partial Eclipse Only

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PacSci-Doku: "Partial Eclipse Only"

By Dennis Schatz - Senior Advisor

Do you Sudoku? It's one of the hottest number games around! Well, here's a twist we think you'll love. We call it PacSci-Doku. Can you guess why? Here's how it works. Instead of filling in the blanks with numbers, we use letters. Hidden in one of the columns or rows is the answer to a science question. You'll find information about the answer on the answer tab below.

The question in this edition is:

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Text Module - The Puzzle" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.62"]

Where do you have to be in the Moon's shadow to only see a partial solar eclipse?

To find the answer, complete this PacSci-Doku using the following nine letters:

U  A  E  Z  R  P  M  B  N

PacSci-Doku Partial Eclipse Only

Puzzle Difficulty: Easy

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_toggle admin_label="Toggle - The Solution" title="The Solution" open="off" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.62"]

Pacsci-Doku Partial Eclipse Only Answer

The question in this edition is:

Where do you have to be in the Moon's shadow to only see a partial solar eclipse?

The answer: Penumbra

On August 21, the Moon will be aligned with the Sun so that the Moon's shadow passes across the surface of the Earth. Because the Sun is a million miles across, its shadow has two sections – the umbra and penumbra – see diagram below.

Solar Eclipse Diagram

A person located in the umbra section of the shadow will see a total solar eclipse, where the Moon covers the entire Sun. The umbra is only about 65 miles across in August, so relatively few people will see the Sun totally covered. But everyone in the U.S. will be in the penumbra part of the shadow and will see a partial solar eclipse. Learn more about the upcoming eclipse by downloading this free 8-page Eclipse Observing Guide.

 

 

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PacSci-Doku: "Partial Eclipse Only"

By Dennis Schatz - Senior Advisor Do you Sudoku? It's one of the hottest number games around! Well, here's a twist we think you'll love. We call it PacSci-Doku. Can you guess why? Here's how it works. Instead of filling in the blanks with numbers, we use letters. Hidden in one of the columns or rows is the answer to a science question. You'll find information about the answer on the answer tab below. The question in this edition is: [/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Text Module - The Puzzle" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.62"] Where do you have to be in the Moon's shadow to only see a partial solar eclipse? To find the answer, complete this PacSci-Doku using the following nine letters: U  A  E  Z  R  P  M  B  N PacSci-Doku Partial Eclipse Only Puzzle Difficulty: Easy [/et_pb_text][et_pb_toggle admin_label="Toggle - The Solution" title="The Solution" open="off" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.62"] Pacsci-Doku Partial Eclipse Only Answer The question in this edition is: Where do you have to be in the Moon's shadow to only see a partial solar eclipse? The answer: Penumbra On August 21, the Moon will be aligned with the Sun so that the Moon's shadow passes across the surface of the Earth. Because the Sun is a million miles across, its shadow has two sections – the umbra and penumbra – see diagram below. Solar Eclipse Diagram A person located in the umbra section of the shadow will see a total solar eclipse, where the Moon covers the entire Sun. The umbra is only about 65 miles across in August, so relatively few people will see the Sun totally covered. But everyone in the U.S. will be in the penumbra part of the shadow and will see a partial solar eclipse. Learn more about the upcoming eclipse by downloading this free 8-page Eclipse Observing Guide.     [/et_pb_toggle][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

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PacSci-Doku: All American Total Solar Eclipse https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/pacsci-doku/all-american-total-solar-eclipse/ Tue, 30 May 2017 15:51:21 +0000 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/?p=16605 PacSci-Doku: All American Total Solar Eclipse

[et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" fullwidth="on" specialty="off" background_image="https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/header-blue-synapses-1280x292.jpg" transparent_background="off" allow_player_pause="off" inner_shadow="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" padding_mobile="off" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" make_equal="off" use_custom_gutter="off" background_color="#ffffff" disabled="off" disabled_on="off|off|off" global_module="6681"][et_pb_fullwidth_header admin_label="Fullwidth Header" global_parent="6681" title="Pacific Science Center" subhead="Bringing science to life." background_layout="dark" text_orientation="left" header_fullscreen="off" header_scroll_down="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" content_orientation="center" image_orientation="center" custom_button_one="off" button_one_letter_spacing="0" button_one_use_icon="default" button_one_icon_placement="right" button_one_on_hover="on" button_one_letter_spacing_hover="0" custom_button_two="off" button_two_letter_spacing="0" button_two_use_icon="default" button_two_icon_placement="right" button_two_on_hover="on" button_two_letter_spacing_hover="0" /][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section"][et_pb_row admin_label="row"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][et_pb_text admin_label="Text Module - Opening Text - Edit ONLY The Title" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

PacSci-Doku: "All American Total Solar Eclipse"

By Dennis Schatz - Senior Advisor

Do you Sudoku? It's one of the hottest number games around! Well, here's a twist we think you'll love. We call it PacSci-Doku. Can you guess why? Here's how it works. Instead of filling in the blanks with numbers, we use letters. Hidden in one of the columns or rows is the answer to a science question. You'll find information about the answer on the answer tab below.

The question in this edition is:

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Text Module - The Puzzle" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

What must occur between the Sun and Moon to have a solar eclipse?

To find the answer, complete this PacSci-Doku using the following nine letters:

A  E  I  N  n  L  T  M  G

[caption id="attachment_16601" align="alignnone" width="450"]PacSci-Doku: All American Total Solar Eclipse The Puzzle[/caption]

Puzzle Difficulty: Medium

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_toggle admin_label="Toggle - The Solution" title="The Solution" open="off" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

[caption id="attachment_16600" align="alignright" width="300"]PacSci-Doku: All American Total Solar Eclipse Answer The Solution[/caption]

The question in this edition is:

What must occur between the Sun and Moon to have a solar eclipse?

The answer: Alignment

On Monday, August 21, 2017, the entire United States will be treated to the first total eclipse of the Sun visible in the continental U.S. in almost 40 years. Because the total eclipse can only be seen in the U.S., it is being called the "All American Total Solar Eclipse." This kind of eclipse occurs when the Earth, Moon and Sun are perfectly in alignment with each other and the Moon moves in front of the Sun to block the Sun's light.

The spectacular total eclipse, where the Sun is fully covered, will only be visible in a narrow band about 60-70 miles across, stretching diagonally across the country from a beach in Oregon to a beach in South Carolina. However, everyone in North America will see a partial solar eclipse, where a big "bite" will be taken out of the Sun.

To get up to speed on the full eclipse story, you will want to download the free 8-page, non-technical Eclipse Guide published by the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA). This covers what causes eclipses, where and when you can see it in August, and how to observe it safely.

For explaining eclipses to children, you will want to consider ordering a copy of When the Sun Goes Dark, also published by NSTA Press.

 

 

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[et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" fullwidth="on" specialty="off" background_image="https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/header-blue-synapses-1280x292.jpg" transparent_background="off" allow_player_pause="off" inner_shadow="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" padding_mobile="off" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" make_equal="off" use_custom_gutter="off" background_color="#ffffff" disabled="off" disabled_on="off|off|off" global_module="6681"][et_pb_fullwidth_header admin_label="Fullwidth Header" global_parent="6681" title="Pacific Science Center" subhead="Bringing science to life." background_layout="dark" text_orientation="left" header_fullscreen="off" header_scroll_down="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" content_orientation="center" image_orientation="center" custom_button_one="off" button_one_letter_spacing="0" button_one_use_icon="default" button_one_icon_placement="right" button_one_on_hover="on" button_one_letter_spacing_hover="0" custom_button_two="off" button_two_letter_spacing="0" button_two_use_icon="default" button_two_icon_placement="right" button_two_on_hover="on" button_two_letter_spacing_hover="0" /][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section"][et_pb_row admin_label="row"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][et_pb_text admin_label="Text Module - Opening Text - Edit ONLY The Title" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

PacSci-Doku: "All American Total Solar Eclipse"

By Dennis Schatz - Senior Advisor Do you Sudoku? It's one of the hottest number games around! Well, here's a twist we think you'll love. We call it PacSci-Doku. Can you guess why? Here's how it works. Instead of filling in the blanks with numbers, we use letters. Hidden in one of the columns or rows is the answer to a science question. You'll find information about the answer on the answer tab below. The question in this edition is: [/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Text Module - The Puzzle" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"] What must occur between the Sun and Moon to have a solar eclipse? To find the answer, complete this PacSci-Doku using the following nine letters: A  E  I  N  n  L  T  M  G [caption id="attachment_16601" align="alignnone" width="450"]PacSci-Doku: All American Total Solar Eclipse The Puzzle[/caption] Puzzle Difficulty: Medium [/et_pb_text][et_pb_toggle admin_label="Toggle - The Solution" title="The Solution" open="off" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"] [caption id="attachment_16600" align="alignright" width="300"]PacSci-Doku: All American Total Solar Eclipse Answer The Solution[/caption] The question in this edition is: What must occur between the Sun and Moon to have a solar eclipse? The answer: Alignment On Monday, August 21, 2017, the entire United States will be treated to the first total eclipse of the Sun visible in the continental U.S. in almost 40 years. Because the total eclipse can only be seen in the U.S., it is being called the "All American Total Solar Eclipse." This kind of eclipse occurs when the Earth, Moon and Sun are perfectly in alignment with each other and the Moon moves in front of the Sun to block the Sun's light. The spectacular total eclipse, where the Sun is fully covered, will only be visible in a narrow band about 60-70 miles across, stretching diagonally across the country from a beach in Oregon to a beach in South Carolina. However, everyone in North America will see a partial solar eclipse, where a big "bite" will be taken out of the Sun. To get up to speed on the full eclipse story, you will want to download the free 8-page, non-technical Eclipse Guide published by the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA). This covers what causes eclipses, where and when you can see it in August, and how to observe it safely. For explaining eclipses to children, you will want to consider ordering a copy of When the Sun Goes Dark, also published by NSTA Press.     [/et_pb_toggle][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

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PacSci-Doku: “Plastic Destroyer” https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/pacsci-doku/plastic-destroyer/ Wed, 17 May 2017 14:56:42 +0000 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/?p=16331 PacSci-Doku: "Plastic Destroyer"

[et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" fullwidth="on" specialty="off" background_image="https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/header-blue-synapses-1280x292.jpg" transparent_background="off" allow_player_pause="off" inner_shadow="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" padding_mobile="off" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" make_equal="off" use_custom_gutter="off" background_color="#ffffff" disabled="off" disabled_on="off|off|off" global_module="6681"][et_pb_fullwidth_header admin_label="Fullwidth Header" global_parent="6681" title="Pacific Science Center" subhead="Bringing science to life." background_layout="dark" text_orientation="left" header_fullscreen="off" header_scroll_down="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" content_orientation="center" image_orientation="center" custom_button_one="off" button_one_letter_spacing="0" button_one_use_icon="default" button_one_icon_placement="right" button_one_on_hover="on" button_one_letter_spacing_hover="0" custom_button_two="off" button_two_letter_spacing="0" button_two_use_icon="default" button_two_icon_placement="right" button_two_on_hover="on" button_two_letter_spacing_hover="0" /][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section"][et_pb_row admin_label="row"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][et_pb_text admin_label="Text Module - Opening Text - Edit ONLY The Title" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

PacSci-Doku: "Plastic Destroyer"

By Dennis Schatz - Senior Advisor

Do you Sudoku? It's one of the hottest number games around! Well, here's a twist we think you'll love. We call it PacSci-Doku. Can you guess why? Here's how it works. Instead of filling in the blanks with numbers, we use letters. Hidden in one of the columns or rows is the answer to a science question. You'll find information about the answer on the answer tab below.

The question in this edition is:

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Text Module - The Puzzle" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

What might provide a way to get rid of our plastic trash?

To find the answer, complete this PacSci-Doku using the following nine letters:

W  w  m  s  r  x  _  o  a

[caption id="attachment_16328" align="alignnone" width="300"]PacSci-Doku: "Plastic Destroyer" The Puzzle[/caption]

Puzzle Difficulty: Hard

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_toggle admin_label="Toggle - The Solution" title="The Solution" open="off" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

[caption id="attachment_16327" align="alignright" width="300"]PacSci-Doku: "Plastic Destroyer" The Solution[/caption]

The question in this edition is:

What might provide a way to get rid of our plastic trash?

The answer: Wax Worms

Federica Bertocchini is a Spanish scientist and amateur beekeeper. One day she was cleaning her beehives by removing wax worms, which eat the honey and wax, and putting them in a plastic bag. Within hours the worms had eaten holes into the bags. The worms weren't just chewing the plastic into little pieces, but were digesting it. This exciting discovery may lead to a new way to eliminate the plastic trash in our environment.

This doesn't mean that we will soon be putting plastic trash into "worm bins" filled with wax worms. The goal of scientists is to identify the enzymes or other aspect of the worm's digestive process that could be used to dispose of the plastic on an industrial level. Read more about this unusual characteristic of the wax worm.

 

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PacSci-Doku: "Plastic Destroyer"

By Dennis Schatz - Senior Advisor Do you Sudoku? It's one of the hottest number games around! Well, here's a twist we think you'll love. We call it PacSci-Doku. Can you guess why? Here's how it works. Instead of filling in the blanks with numbers, we use letters. Hidden in one of the columns or rows is the answer to a science question. You'll find information about the answer on the answer tab below. The question in this edition is: [/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Text Module - The Puzzle" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"] What might provide a way to get rid of our plastic trash? To find the answer, complete this PacSci-Doku using the following nine letters: W  w  m  s  r  x  _  o  a [caption id="attachment_16328" align="alignnone" width="300"]PacSci-Doku: "Plastic Destroyer" The Puzzle[/caption] Puzzle Difficulty: Hard [/et_pb_text][et_pb_toggle admin_label="Toggle - The Solution" title="The Solution" open="off" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"] [caption id="attachment_16327" align="alignright" width="300"]PacSci-Doku: "Plastic Destroyer" The Solution[/caption] The question in this edition is: What might provide a way to get rid of our plastic trash? The answer: Wax Worms Federica Bertocchini is a Spanish scientist and amateur beekeeper. One day she was cleaning her beehives by removing wax worms, which eat the honey and wax, and putting them in a plastic bag. Within hours the worms had eaten holes into the bags. The worms weren't just chewing the plastic into little pieces, but were digesting it. This exciting discovery may lead to a new way to eliminate the plastic trash in our environment. This doesn't mean that we will soon be putting plastic trash into "worm bins" filled with wax worms. The goal of scientists is to identify the enzymes or other aspect of the worm's digestive process that could be used to dispose of the plastic on an industrial level. Read more about this unusual characteristic of the wax worm.   [/et_pb_toggle][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

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PacSci-Doku: Neanderthal’s Dinner https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/pacsci-doku/neanderthals-dinner/ Thu, 20 Apr 2017 00:54:50 +0000 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/?p=15740 PacSci-Doku: Neanderthal's Dinner

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PacSci-Doku: "Neanderthal's Dinner"

By Dennis Schatz - Senior Advisor

Do you Sudoku? It's one of the hottest number games around! Well, here's a twist we think you'll love. We call it PacSci-Doku. Can you guess why? Here's how it works. Instead of filling in the blanks with numbers, we use letters. Hidden in one of the columns or rows is the answer to a science question. You'll find information about the answer on the answer tab below.

The question in this edition is:

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Text Module - The Puzzle" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

What microscopic material tells us what Neanderthals ate?

To find the answer, complete this PacSci-Doku using the following nine letters:

I  E  A  U  M  T  B  C  R

[caption id="attachment_15737" align="alignnone" width="450"]PacSci-Doku: Neanderthal's Dinner The Puzzle[/caption]

Puzzle Difficulty: Easy

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_toggle admin_label="Toggle - The Answer" title="The Answer" open="off" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

[caption id="attachment_15736" align="alignright" width="450"]PacSci-Doku: Neanderthal's Dinner Answer The Puzzle Solution[/caption]

The question in this edition is:

What microscopic material tells us what Neanderthal's ate?

The answer: Bacterium

It would be great if we could explore the contents of Neanderthal's stomach, but the soft organs of ancient humans usually rot away, so we cannot use the stomach contents to determine what Neanderthals ate thousands of years after they walked on the Earth. But Neanderthal's teeth do survive and contain bacteria that indicate what they ate. Scientists from the University of Adelaide recently studied four Neanderthals that lived 42,000 to 50,000 years ago – and found some amazing discoveries.

Analysis of Neanderthal teeth found near what is now Belgium showed they ate woolly rhinoceros, sheep and edible mushrooms. Neanderthals that lived near what is now Spain seemed to be vegetarians, eating mushrooms, pine nuts and moss.

One Neanderthal, who was suffering from a tooth abscess, had traces of salicylic acid DNA (the active ingredient in aspirin) in his teeth, plus pieces of the fungus Penicillium (which produces the antibiotic penicillin). This makes some scientists wonder if Neanderthals knew enough to medicate themselves – definitely the sign of an intelligent human.

Read more about this research, which was recently written up in the scientific journal Nature.

 

[/et_pb_toggle][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

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PacSci-Doku: "Neanderthal's Dinner"

By Dennis Schatz - Senior Advisor Do you Sudoku? It's one of the hottest number games around! Well, here's a twist we think you'll love. We call it PacSci-Doku. Can you guess why? Here's how it works. Instead of filling in the blanks with numbers, we use letters. Hidden in one of the columns or rows is the answer to a science question. You'll find information about the answer on the answer tab below. The question in this edition is: [/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Text Module - The Puzzle" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"] What microscopic material tells us what Neanderthals ate? To find the answer, complete this PacSci-Doku using the following nine letters: I  E  A  U  M  T  B  C  R [caption id="attachment_15737" align="alignnone" width="450"]PacSci-Doku: Neanderthal's Dinner The Puzzle[/caption] Puzzle Difficulty: Easy [/et_pb_text][et_pb_toggle admin_label="Toggle - The Answer" title="The Answer" open="off" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"] [caption id="attachment_15736" align="alignright" width="450"]PacSci-Doku: Neanderthal's Dinner Answer The Puzzle Solution[/caption] The question in this edition is: What microscopic material tells us what Neanderthal's ate? The answer: Bacterium It would be great if we could explore the contents of Neanderthal's stomach, but the soft organs of ancient humans usually rot away, so we cannot use the stomach contents to determine what Neanderthals ate thousands of years after they walked on the Earth. But Neanderthal's teeth do survive and contain bacteria that indicate what they ate. Scientists from the University of Adelaide recently studied four Neanderthals that lived 42,000 to 50,000 years ago – and found some amazing discoveries. Analysis of Neanderthal teeth found near what is now Belgium showed they ate woolly rhinoceros, sheep and edible mushrooms. Neanderthals that lived near what is now Spain seemed to be vegetarians, eating mushrooms, pine nuts and moss. One Neanderthal, who was suffering from a tooth abscess, had traces of salicylic acid DNA (the active ingredient in aspirin) in his teeth, plus pieces of the fungus Penicillium (which produces the antibiotic penicillin). This makes some scientists wonder if Neanderthals knew enough to medicate themselves – definitely the sign of an intelligent human. Read more about this research, which was recently written up in the scientific journal Nature.   [/et_pb_toggle][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

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