Pacific Science Center https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org Sun, 28 May 2017 01:16:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/pacsci-site-icon-320x320-150x150.jpg Pacific Science Center https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org 32 32 Fresh Sheet – May 27, 2017 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/life-sciences-blog/fresh-sheet-2017-05-27/ Sat, 27 May 2017 07:01:50 +0000 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/?p=16564 Here's what's new this week at Pacific Science Center's Tropical Butterfly House where our plants are just as fascinating as the residents.

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PacSci Perspectives

 

Vindula dejone

Vindula dejone (The Cruiser) checking out Lantana camara (Shrub verbena) in our Tropical Butterfly House.

Most people visit our Tropical Butterfly House to see colorful and amazing butterflies. But some guests come to enjoy the lush flowers and tropical plants as well. One of the most prolifically flowering bushes in our garden is Lantana camara (Shrub verbena). Originally native to Central and South America, this shrub can now be found in tropical areas around the world as it has become a successful invasive species.

Many of our tropical butterflies can be found nectaring on Lantana flowers. If you happen to see nectaring activity on your next visit, why not take a photo and upload it to Instagram or Twitter with the #CitizenSci hashtag? If you like, identify the plant and butterfly species or let Pacific Science Center’s Living Exhibits staff respond on social media. We’d love to hear from you!

Penang Butterfly Farm
Malaysia

30 – Attacus atlas (Atlas Moth)
94 – Cethosia cyane (Leopard Lacewing)
38 – Hypolimnas bolina (Blue moon)
90 – Idea leuconoe (Paper Kite)
2 – Papilio memnon (Great Memnon)
90 – Parthenos sylvia (The Clipper)
6 – Tirumala septentrionis (Dark Blue Tiger)
90 – Vindula dejone  (The Cruiser)

Total = 440

“Fresh Sheet” is our weekly shipment report of pupae on display in the emerging window. Visit Pacific Science Center’s Tropical Butterfly House and meet our newest residents.

These butterflies typically arrive as pupae on the Thursday or Friday before the Fresh Sheet is published. Some of these butterflies will start emerging the day they arrive or the next day, but other species may take a full week before they reach adulthood. After emerging, they may live for a week or even a few months! While we love sharing a variety of species with our guests, we cannot guarantee that any specific species will be flying on the day that you visit Pacific Science Center.

If you are interested in photographing a specific butterfly and would like to be updated about when it is flying in the Tropical Butterfly House, please email Butterflies@pacsci.org with details and your contact information.

 

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Volunteer Coordinator Assistant Intern https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/volunteer/volunteer-coordinator-assistant-intern-2017-05-25/ Thu, 25 May 2017 23:16:59 +0000 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/?p=16537 The post Volunteer Coordinator Assistant Intern appeared first on Pacific Science Center.

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Pacific Science Center

Bringing science to life.

Pacific Science Center’s Human Resources Department has an exciting internship opportunity for a student pursuing a volunteer management career. Pacific Science Center engages 500 regularly active volunteers, almost 1,000 special event volunteers, and an extra 150 teen volunteers for the summer months. Spring is a transition time and involves volunteer planning, recruitment, and onboarding for the upcoming busy summer season.

The Volunteer Coordinator Assistant Intern is a member of the Human Resources team and will play an integral role in volunteer recruitment, candidate sourcing, interview facilitation, training support, benefits coordination, and special projects/research. At the internship’s conclusion, the intern will have gained valuable volunteer recruitment, onboarding and administration skills.

Reports To: Volunteer Engagement Manager
Position Start Date: March 2017
Position End Date: August 2017
Time Commitment: 15 hours a week (may involve some evening and weekend hours)

Job Duties

  • Assist with volunteer recruitment planning
  • Research volunteer recruitment sources and post volunteer positions
  • Manage applicants
  • Track screening process
  • Co-facilitate group interviews
  • Assist with background checks and references for new volunteers
  • Co-facilitate trainings and assist with onboarding new volunteers
  • Develop the employer brand of Pacific Science Center including development of social media posts, exposure to marketing strategy and acting as an ambassador for the Science Center at recruitment fairs (as available)
  • Assist with administrative of volunteer benefits
  • Help to plan and execute volunteer recognition events
  • Provide general administrative support to the HR department
  • Other duties as assigned

Learning Opportunities

  • Develop high-level administrative skills associated with recruiting and onboarding large volumes of volunteers while utilizing Volgistics volunteer management software program
  • Strengthen communication skills through interactions with applicants, Human Resources and other Pacific Science Center staff and hiring managers
  • Demonstrate leadership skills while working in a team environment
  • Learn project management and balance collaborative with self-led work
  • Cultivate public speaking skills through co-facilitation of staff interviews and trainings
  • Gain insight into the inner-workings of a busy Volunteer Program and Human Resources Department with a demanding work load

Position Requirements

  • Current college or graduate student working towards a degree with an interest in volunteer managment
  • Strong skills in word processing, desktop publishing and document production
  • Must have very strong attention to detail
  • Excellent customer service skills and service orientation
  • Track record of working well within a team environment
  • Courteous professional manner
  • Independent, self-led learner
  • Must be able to provide 3 references and pass a background check

TO APPLY: Email a cover letter and resume to volunteers@pacsci.org with the title “Volunteer Coordinator Assistant Intern.”


Pacific Science Center

We are an independent, not-for-profit educational institution that ignites curiosity in every child and fuels a passion for discovery, experimentation, and critical thinking in all of us.

Pacific Science Center is an equal-opportunity employer. We value diversity and it is expressed in all aspects, from the people and communities we serve to our organizational culture and our employees.

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What Does A Scientist Look Like? https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/news/what-does-a-scientist-look-like-2017-05-22/ Tue, 23 May 2017 01:21:37 +0000 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/?p=16438 Quick! What does a scientist look like? If your first thought looks something like a certain time traveling doctor, then you need to meet this local scientist from the UW.

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PacSci Perspectives

 

My name is Kaitlyn. I like the theater and the zoo. I have a drawer full of tea in my kitchen, and I play tennis. And, oh yeah, I’m a scientist.

If I’d asked you to guess what my profession was, would you have guessed what I do? (No fair if you did because you’re reading this in a science magazine!) Or more importantly: if I had asked you to imagine a scientist, would you have thought of someone who looked like me? For most people, the answer is no.

Dozens of studies have asked kids to draw and describe what they think a scientist is like. They usually come up with an image that looks very much like a stereotypical movie scientist. If you’re picturing them drawing Doc Brown from “Back to the Future,” you’re not far off. Adults, even adult scientists, do this too. This isn’t a diverse or inviting picture to kids thinking about a career in science, or adults wondering if they can ask a scientist for answers or advice. Media depictions of scientists are only reinforcing this image too.

I was lucky that I had an extraordinary science teacher at my elementary school. I had opportunities to meet science role models and explore science for myself. I saw myself as someone who could be a scientist. Today, I’m getting my PhD in neuroscience at the University of Washington, where I study how the brain changes its activity both naturally and in learning a new skill. To me, scientists are my friends and colleagues and teachers.

I probably wouldn’t be where I am today if the people around me hadn’t shown me that scientists are people like me. That even when I was ten years old and science was just bottle rockets in the school parking lot. I discovered experimental error then too: I accidentally hit a moving car with the cork from my unexpectedly powerful bottle rocket. New hypothesis to test: bottle rockets on the soccer field. Already doing science, already a scientist.

At Pacific Science Center I pass those opportunities I had on to kids and adults: to meet a scientist, to see yourself as a scientist, to learn that you don’t have to be a professional to still be a scientist, and to show that scientists are just regular people from all walks of life who happen to have a really cool job. Come find me at the Science Center programs and lectures!


Meet scientists like Kaitlyn on most Saturdays at Pacific Science Center. Stop by Ackerley Family Exhibit Gallery to engage in hands-on activities relating to research being conducted by local scientists. Learn More

 

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Fresh Sheet – May 20, 2017 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/life-sciences-blog/fresh-sheet-2017-05-20/ Sat, 20 May 2017 07:01:30 +0000 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/?p=16390 Here's what's new this week at Pacific Science Center's Tropical Butterfly House where you'll find some Morpho polyphemus (White Morpho) flying around or visiting the fruit sways.

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PacSci Perspectives

 

Morpho polyphemus (White Morpho)

Morpho polyphemus (White Morpho)

This week you will find some Morpho polyphemus (White Morpho) flying around or visiting the fruit sways in our Tropical Butterfly House. Very similar in size and shape to its genus cousin the popular Morpho peleides (Blue Morpho), the White Morpho butterfly appears to have a subtle mother-of-pearl sheen on its wings. Around Pacific Science Center we often refer to Morpho polyphemus as the White Handkerchief butterfly and when you watch one flutter its elegant wings, you’ll understand why.

Bioproductores de El Salvador

25 – Archeoprepona demophoon (Hubner’s Prepona)
35 – Caligo memnon (Owl Butterfly)
25 – Catonephele numilia (Halloween Butterfly)
30 – Eurytides thymbraeus (White-crested Swallowtail)
16 – Heliconius hecale (Tiger Longwing)
17 – Heliconius hortense (Mountain Longwing)
19 – Heliconius ismenius (Ismenius Longwing)
25 – Lycorea cleobaea (Large Tiger)
35 – Morpho peleides (Blue Morpho)
30 – Morpho polyphemus (White Morpho)
20 – Myscelia ethusa (Royal Blue Butterfly)
30 – Papilio androgeus (Queen Page)
25 – Papilio erostratus (Dusky Swallowtail)
30 – Papilio pilumnus (Three-tailed Swallowtail)
25 – Papilio torquatus (Band-gapped Swallowtail)
15 – Archeoprepona demophon (One-spotted Prepona)
10 – Prepona omphale (Blue Belly-Button)
15 – Tithorea harmonia (Harmonia Tigerwing)

Total = 427

“Fresh Sheet” is our weekly shipment report of pupae on display in the emerging window. Visit Pacific Science Center’s Tropical Butterfly House and meet our newest residents.

These butterflies typically arrive as pupae on the Thursday or Friday before the Fresh Sheet is published. Some of these butterflies will start emerging the day they arrive or the next day, but other species may take a full week before they reach adulthood. After emerging, they may live for a week or even a few months! While we love sharing a variety of species with our guests, we cannot guarantee that any specific species will be flying on the day that you visit Pacific Science Center.

If you are interested in photographing a specific butterfly and would like to be updated about when it is flying in the Tropical Butterfly House, please email Butterflies@pacsci.org with details and your contact information.

 

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New Exhibit On Surgery To Display At
 Pacific Science Center https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/news/new-exhibit-on-surgery-to-display-at-pacific-science-center/ Thu, 18 May 2017 23:20:03 +0000 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/?p=16382 New Exhibit On Surgery To Display at 
Pacific Science Center. Surgery + Innovation = A Better Way to Operate opens June 10.

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 Pacific Science Center appeared first on Pacific Science Center.

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PacSci Perspectives

Surgery + Innovation = A Better Way to Operate Opens June 10

SEATTLE, WA (May 18, 2017) – Surgeons heal diseases and repair injuries by cutting, reshaping, and stitching the body. However, modern innovations in surgery are allowing surgical teams to repair and heal with less trauma to patients. Our latest exhibition, Surgery + Innovation = A Better Way to Operate, explores these innovations. The exhibit runs June 10 through December 3, 2017.

Guests will explore advances in surgical training, patient empowerment, and surgical methods that are improving patient outcomes and, in some cases, may lead to a future where ailments that previously required surgery no longer do.

Discover how research teams here in the Northwest are making realistic simulations of human body parts to help surgeons develop critical skills. How’s your manual dexterity? In the exhibit, practice training to do minimally invasive surgery like surgeons do by using pinchers to move blocks within a box. Learn how empowering patients to make lifestyle changes before surgery and to monitor themselves with their smart phones after surgery leads to better outcomes. Examine surgical tools and activate a step-by-step simulation of a procedure that fixes a damaged blood vessel by threading tools through the body instead of creating an incision. Explore current research being conducted right in our backyard at the University of Washington School of Medicine.

Surgery + Innovation = A Better Way to Operate will be showcased in The Studio, located in the Wellbody Academy. The Studio is a changing exhibit space showcasing the work of local scientists through a combination of digital media, graphics, objects, interactive displays, and live programs. Exhibits change twice a year. Entry into The Studio is included with Pacific Science Center admission. More information can be obtained at www.pacificsciencecenter.org/exhibits/the-studio.

 

MORE INFORMATION
Contact: Delaney Berreth
PR & Marketing Coordinator 
(206) 443-3659; dberreth@pacsci.org

ABOUT PACIFIC SCIENCE CENTER
Pacific Science Center is an independent, not-for-profit institution in Seattle. The institution’s mission is to ignite curiosity in every child and fuels a passion for discovery, experimentation, and critical thinking in all of us. Pacific Science Center’s award-winning, interactive programs reach more than 1.1 million people each year – in their communities, classrooms, and on the Pacific Science Center campus and at the Mercer Slough Environmental Education Center. Pacific Science Center began as the United States Science Pavilion during the 1962 Seattle World’s Fair. Millions came to explore the wonders of science during the World’s Fair and upon closing ceremonies, the Science Pavilion was given new life as the private not-for-profit Pacific Science Center, becoming the first U.S. museum founded as a science and technology center. On July 22, 2010 Pacific Science Center was declared a City of Seattle Landmark.

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 Pacific Science Center appeared first on Pacific Science Center.

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PacSci-Doku: “Plastic Destroyer” https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/pacsci-doku/plastic-destroyer/ Wed, 17 May 2017 14:56:42 +0000 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/?p=16331 The post PacSci-Doku: “Plastic Destroyer” appeared first on Pacific Science Center.

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Pacific Science Center

Bringing science to life.

 

PacSci-Doku: “Plastic Destroyer”

By Dennis Schatz – Senior Advisor

Do you Sudoku? It’s one of the hottest number games around! Well, here’s a twist we think you’ll love. We call it PacSci-Doku. Can you guess why? Here’s how it works. Instead of filling in the blanks with numbers, we use letters. Hidden in one of the columns or rows is the answer to a science question. You’ll find information about the answer on the answer tab below.

The question in this edition is:

What might provide a way to get rid of our plastic trash?

To find the answer, complete this PacSci-Doku using the following nine letters:

W  w  m  s  r  x  _  o  a

PacSci-Doku: "Plastic Destroyer"

The Puzzle

Puzzle Difficulty: Hard

The Solution
PacSci-Doku: "Plastic Destroyer"

The Solution

The question in this edition is:

What might provide a way to get rid of our plastic trash?

The answer: Wax Worms

Federica Bertocchini is a Spanish scientist and amateur beekeeper. One day she was cleaning her beehives by removing wax worms, which eat the honey and wax, and putting them in a plastic bag. Within hours the worms had eaten holes into the bags. The worms weren’t just chewing the plastic into little pieces, but were digesting it. This exciting discovery may lead to a new way to eliminate the plastic trash in our environment.

This doesn’t mean that we will soon be putting plastic trash into “worm bins” filled with wax worms. The goal of scientists is to identify the enzymes or other aspect of the worm’s digestive process that could be used to dispose of the plastic on an industrial level. Read more about this unusual characteristic of the wax worm.

 

 

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Tips For Seeing Terracotta Warriors Of The First Emperor https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/news/tips-for-seeing-terracotta-warriors-of-the-first-emperor/ Tue, 16 May 2017 18:15:14 +0000 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/?p=16301 Have you been wanting to see Terracotta Warriors of the First Emperor, but weren't sure when to go? We've gathered some tips and tricks for you to make the most out of your experience.

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PacSci Perspectives

 

Have you been wanting to see Terracotta Warriors of the First Emperor, but weren’t sure when to go? Now’s your chance to see our newest exhibit in the best ways possible. We’ve gathered some tips and tricks for you to make the most out of your experience.

  • Go on a weekday, specifically, Monday. Mondays are the only weekday we don’t have school groups visiting. If you’re hoping for a quieter, less-crowded experience inside the exhibit, visit us then. If you can’t go on a Monday, any weekday afternoon will be quieter.
  • Learn more about the Qin Dynasty and the warriors by seeing Mysteries of China in IMAX® prior to viewing the exhibit. This movie gives audiences background information in a quick, 45-minute documentary.
  • Learn even more by attending our planetarium show, The Skies of Ancient China. For over 4,000 years astronomers in China have made observations of the stars, the planets and the Moon. Their detailed observations of eclipses, comets and “guest stars” are still studied by modern astronomers. This is a 40-minute presentation and is live.
  • Make a day out of it. We asked our staff and they’ve planned their perfect day to visit just for your convenience:
    • 11:45 a.m. See Mysteries of China in IMAX.
    • 12:45 p.m.: Enter Terracotta Warriors of the First Emperor and marvel at the 10 original statues and over 100 original artifacts. Take all the time you want.
    • 4 p.m.: Visit the Willard Smith Planetarium for The Skies of Ancient China.
    • Use any extra time you have to explore all we have to offer! From the butterfly house to Tinker Tank to the Live Science Shows, you can have a fun-filled day at Pacific Science Center.
  • Take a picture with a warrior. One of our warrior replicas is touring Seattle. Take a picture, tag us, and use the hashtag #WheresTheWarrior for a chance to win 2 tickets to the exhibit.
  • Plan ahead and reserve your tickets in advance. Because entry into our exhibit is limited to 75 people every 15 minutes, you may have to wait for the next available time slot if it is sold out. To ensure you can see the exhibit at your preferred time, reserve your tickets online.
  • See the exhibit after hours. Attend THEORY: Festival 2017 for exclusive access to the exhibit. Not only will you get to see the exhibit, you’ll get to enjoy the whole Science Center, along with unlimited local drinks and food. More information and tickets are available at pacsci.org/theory-festival-2017.

 

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Fresh Sheet – May 13, 2017 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/life-sciences-blog/fresh-sheet-2017-05-13/ Sat, 13 May 2017 07:01:09 +0000 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/?p=16226 Here's what's new this week at Pacific Science Center's Tropical Butterfly House. This week’s shipment from Costa Rica includes the photogenic Siproeta stelenes (Malachite). Stop by and take a snap!

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PacSci Perspectives

 

Siproeta stelenes (Malachite)

Siproeta stelenes (Malachite)

This week we feature the strikingly beautiful Siproeta stelenes (Malachite) butterfly from Costa Rica. Their common name suggests the green mineral coloration that dominates their wing pigment. Look closely and you will find varying shades of green from emerald to lime which are especially striking when backlit with sunlight. The malachite wing cells are complimented with umber outlines. Guests visiting our Tropical Butterfly House enjoy photographing the Malachite, as this species is an uninhibited model. Look for these large, handsome butterflies nectaring on Lantana flowers or feeding on mangoes in the fruit sways.

Suministros Entomológicos Costerricenses, S.A.
CRES, Costa Rica

25 – Battus belus (Belus Swallowtail)
30 – Caligo memnon (Owl Butterfly)
20 – Catonephele numilia (Halloween Butterfly)
17 – Danaus plexippus (The Monarch)
15 – Dryadula phaetusa  (Banded Orange Heliconian)
7 – Eueudes isabella (Isabella’s Longwing)
18 – Greta oto (Glasswing)
9 – Hamadryas februa (Gray Calico)
15 – Heliconius doris (Doris Longwing)
23 – Heliconius hecale (Tiger Longwing)
18 – Heliconius hewitsoni (Hewitson’s Longwing)
25 – Heliconius ismenius (Ismenius Longwing)
24 – Heliconius melpomene (Postman)
32 – Morpho peleides (Blue Morpho)
17 – Myselia cyaniris (Blue Wave Butterfly)
22 – Papilio thoas (Thoas Swallowtail)
5 – Parides arcas (Arcas Cattleheart)
30 – Siproeta stelenes (Malachite)

Total = 352

“Fresh Sheet” is our weekly shipment report of pupae on display in the emerging window. Visit Pacific Science Center’s Tropical Butterfly House and meet our newest residents.

These butterflies typically arrive as pupae on the Thursday or Friday before the Fresh Sheet is published. Some of these butterflies will start emerging the day they arrive or the next day, but other species may take a full week before they reach adulthood. After emerging, they may live for a week or even a few months! While we love sharing a variety of species with our guests, we cannot guarantee that any specific species will be flying on the day that you visit Pacific Science Center.

If you are interested in photographing a specific butterfly and would like to be updated about when it is flying in the Tropical Butterfly House, please email Butterflies@pacsci.org with details and your contact information.

 

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Fresh Sheet – May 6, 2017 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/life-sciences-blog/fresh-sheet-2017-05-06/ Sat, 06 May 2017 07:01:53 +0000 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/?p=16032 Here's what's new this week at Pacific Science Center's Tropical Butterfly House. This time we focus on sexual dimorphism.

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PacSci Perspectives

 

 

Catonephele orites (Orange-banded Shoemaker) male

Catonephele orites (Orange-banded Shoemaker) male.

Catonephele orites (Orange-banded Shoemaker) female

Catonephele orites (Orange-banded Shoemaker) female.

 

Many animal species are sexually dimorphic. That means that the male looks different from the female. We are aware of the different male/female appearances among some animals, but take a look – there are many species of butterflies that exhibit sexual dimorphism.

An example of a subtle difference between male and female butterflies can be found in Anartia amathea (Scarlet Peacock) where the male simply exhibits a more intense coloration than the female. A more obvious example of butterfly sexual dimorphism is indicated in the featured butterfly pictured above: Catonephele orites (Orange-banded Shoemaker). In this case, the female doesn’t have an “orange band” and could easily be mistake for a different species.

Look around our Tropical Butterfly House the next time you visit. See if you can find examples of sexually dimorphic butterflies.

Neotropical Insects NV
Suriname

11 – Battus polydamas (Polydamus Swallowtail)
10 – Heraclides thoas (Thoas Swallowtail)
50 – Heraclides anchisiades (Ruby-spotted Swallowtail)
20 – Heliconius melpomene (Postman)
37 – Dryas iulia (Julia Longwing)
20 – Catonephele orites (Orange-banded Shoemaker)
50 – Anartia amathea (Scarlet Peacock)
10 – Archeoprepona demophoon (Hubner’s Prepona)
50 – Caligo memnon (Owl Butterfly)
7 – Eryphanis polyxena (Purple Mort Bleu Owl)
15 – Mechanitis polymnia (Polymnia Tigerwing)
20 – Tithorea harmonia (Harmonia Tigerwing)

Total = 300

“Fresh Sheet” is our weekly shipment report of pupae on display in the emerging window. Visit Pacific Science Center’s Tropical Butterfly House and meet our newest residents.

These butterflies typically arrive as pupae on the Thursday or Friday before the Fresh Sheet is published. Some of these butterflies will start emerging the day they arrive or the next day, but other species may take a full week before they reach adulthood. After emerging, they may live for a week or even a few months! While we love sharing a variety of species with our guests, we cannot guarantee that any specific species will be flying on the day that you visit Pacific Science Center.

If you are interested in photographing a specific butterfly and would like to be updated about when it is flying in the Tropical Butterfly House, please email Butterflies@pacsci.org with details and your contact information.

 

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Fresh Sheet – April 29, 2017 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/life-sciences-blog/fresh-sheet-2017-04-29/ Sat, 29 Apr 2017 07:01:46 +0000 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/?p=15913 Here's what's new this week at Pacific Science Center's Tropical Butterfly House. Our butterfly pupae shipment comes from Malaysia this week.

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PacSci Perspectives

 

Precis atlites (Grey Pansy)

Precis atlites (Grey Pansy) photographed by George Pagos, February 2017, Siem Reap, Cambodia.

Our butterfly pupae shipment comes from Malaysia this week. One of the beauties from the collection is Precis atlites (Grey Pansy) that also is known as Junonia atlites. This nymphalidae butterfly is quite plentiful in the gardens of Southeast Asia. On a recent trip to Cambodia we were delighted to spot them flying freely in dry and lush habitats. While there, we visited Banteay Srey Butterfly Centre near Angkor Wat and saw many Grey Pansy butterflies among other familiar species. When we asked our guide if we could see those caterpillars, he politely told us that the Grey Pansys inside the garden were interlopers from outside the nets. The butterfly is considered too common and abundant for them to cultivate. Nevertheless, we love them and hope you enjoy observing them in our Tropical Butterfly House.

Penang Butterfly Farm
Malaysia

90 – Cethosia cyane (Leopard Lacewing)
30 – Hypolimnas bolina  (Blue moon)
80 – Idea leuconoe  (Paper Kite)
80 – Parthenos sylvia (The Clipper)
8 – Precis almana (Peacock Pansy)
6 – Precis atlites (Gray Pansy)
26 – Tirumala septentrionus (Dark Blue Tiger)
80 – Vindula dejone  (The Cruiser)

Total = 400

“Fresh Sheet” is our weekly shipment report of pupae on display in the emerging window. Visit Pacific Science Center’s Tropical Butterfly House and meet our newest residents.

These butterflies typically arrive as pupae on the Thursday or Friday before the Fresh Sheet is published. Some of these butterflies will start emerging the day they arrive or the next day, but other species may take a full week before they reach adulthood. After emerging, they may live for a week or even a few months! While we love sharing a variety of species with our guests, we cannot guarantee that any specific species will be flying on the day that you visit Pacific Science Center.

If you are interested in photographing a specific butterfly and would like to be updated about when it is flying in the Tropical Butterfly House, please email Butterflies@pacsci.org with details and your contact information.

 

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