Pacific Science Center https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org Thu, 30 Mar 2017 17:07:45 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/pacsci-site-icon-320x320-150x150.jpg Pacific Science Center https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org 32 32 Nothing Wrong With Second Hand, Babbitty Makes Full Recovery https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/life-sciences-blog/nothing-wrong-second-hand-babbitty-makes-full-recovery/ Mon, 27 Mar 2017 01:00:48 +0000 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/?p=15221 Babbitty, our resident albino axolotl recently put on a demonstration of the axolotl's amazing ability to completely regenerate almost any part of their body, without even leaving a scar.

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PacSci Perspectives

Babbitty, the albino axolotl

Babbitty, the albino axolotl

If you have ever visited Pacific Science Center’s animal exhibits before, you have likely noticed our axolotls. They tend to stand out from other animals, thanks in no small part to their unusual appearance and a permanent happy expression on their faces. Our axolotl ambassadors Flopsy, Simpkin, and Babbitty, like all axolotls, are amphibians, a class of animals that also includes salamanders (their close relatives) and frogs. Amphibians are known for their peculiar life cycles: they begin their lives underwater, breathing through gills and rarely (if ever) going on land. As they grow, they metamorphose into a different form. By the time they are adults, they breathe air like any land-dwelling animal, and can survive just fine outside of the water. This is where they get their name. “Amphibian” comes from the Greek “amphi,” meaning both, and “bios,” meaning life–which describes perfectly a group of animals that live one life in the water and another on land.

Babbitty on December 13, 11 days after her injury. An elbow is forming! Can you see the larger part of her arm where this new joint will be?

Babbitty on December 13, 11 days after her injury. An elbow is forming. Can you see the larger part of her arm where this new joint will be?

Axolotls, however, are peculiar–they spend their entire lives underwater! This is because they have evolved an adaptation that prevents them from metamorphosing into an adult form. They are permanently juveniles, which is why they have those feathery gills on their heads that allow them to breathe underwater. Imagine living your whole life without ever growing up. I would imagine there are many different opinions about whether or not that would be a good or bad thing, but axolotls seem to be just fine with it. In fact, it may contribute to one of their most interesting abilities: regeneration. This species is well-known in the scientific and medical communities for their ability to completely regenerate almost any part of their body, without even leaving a scar. Babbitty, our young albino axolotl, was injured while on exhibit, causing her to lose one of her front limbs. While this might be a severe problem for most animals, for Babbitty, growing back her limb only took a little more than a month. Volunteer Terry took photos of her periodically while she was healing, so now we can take a look at Babbitty’s arm as she grew it back.

The exact mechanics of regeneration are complicated, and many scientists today are conducting research on the phenomenon, hoping to get a better understanding of how the healing can be so close to perfection and happen so quickly. Most animals (including humans) can only regenerate very specific parts of the body, such as skin, hair, fingernails, and parts of the liver. However, even when we do regenerate, there is a limit to the amount of damage we can recover from. For axolotls, almost any body part can heal so well that there is no visible evidence that the part was ever injured in the first place.

Babbitty, on day 21 (January 3) of her regeneration.

Babbitty on day 21 (January 3) of her regeneration. Her elbow has finished forming and you can see her forearm developing.

Babbitty on day 24 (January 6) of her regeneration.

Babbitty on day 24 (January 6) of her regeneration. You can see the start of some new digits.

Researchers have discovered that they can even regenerate parts of the spinal cord, an injury that would cause permanent and/or extensive damage to most other vertebrates.

Okay, so we all agree that this is quite an amazing ability. “But,” you say, “I am a scientist! I need to know how it works!” You are absolutely justified in saying that, and I commend you for it. Plus, as it turns out, the mechanism behind axolotl regeneration is a genius and incredible feat of evolution. But, in order to understand it, we need to understand how body parts develop in the first place. The answer: stem cells.

All living things are made up of cells. Each cell in a multicellular organism is specialized to be part of a larger part of the body. When a cell is developing, however, it is something called a pluripotent stem cell. This means it has the potential to be one of many different kinds of cells. The type of cell it will become is determined by many factors, especially the kind of cells that are next to it. In most organisms, once a pluripotent stem cell has differentiated (i.e. developed into one specific kind of cell), it will perform only that function until it dies.

However, axolotl cells can do something amazing: when a body part is damaged, the cells at the site of the injury can actually revert to being pluripotent stem cells. That’s right: they can “de-differentiate” and then re-develop into whatever type of cell needs to be replaced in order for that body part to heal. These cells can then reproduce in order to restore the part to its original glory!

Day 55 (February 4) of her regeneration

Day 55 (February 4) of her regeneration. You can see clearly defined digits now.

Day one hundred (March 21) of her regeneration.

Day 100 (March 21) of her regeneration. Her arm is almost completely regenerated!

As expected, Babbitty fully recovered from her injuries and now has a brand new front leg that looks good as new. Unfortunately, soon after reintroducing her to the exhibit, we noticed Flopsy, our oldest and largest axolotl, exhibiting aggressive behaviors towards her. Axolotls, especially older, more mature individuals, can be territorial and defensive of their food towards newcomers. It is possible that during Babbitty’s time off-exhibit, Flopsy forgot who she was, and acted as if she was a brand new intruder. So for the time being, Babbitty will be living in our office in her own private tank. Don’t worry, though. Axolotls are mostly solitary animals, so she is perfectly happy swimming around on her own. Congrats, Babbitty. It turns out she barely even needed us to lend a hand!

Sources used/interesting links:

https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/guest-blog/regeneration-the-axolotl-story/

http://www.spiegel.de/international/zeitgeist/miracle-healer-scientists-attempt-to-crack-secret-code-of-the-axolotl-a-732283.html

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Fresh Sheet – March 25, 2017 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/life-sciences-blog/fresh-sheet-2017-03-25/ Sat, 25 Mar 2017 07:01:29 +0000 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/?p=15185 Here's what's new this week at Pacific Science Center's Tropical Butterfly House. Many butterflies have species names from Greek mythology. Our Tropical Butterfly House has many examples.

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PacSci Perspectives

Morpho polyphemus (White Morpho)

Morpho polyphemus (White Morpho)

What’s in a Name?

Carl Linnaeus’ scientific system of naming all life forms includes two Latin names, the genus and the species. The genus designation (always capitalized) is the grouping or tribe of an organism whereas the species name applies only to that one organism. Have you ever wondered how some animals get their species names? We do!

This week’s featured butterfly is the Morpho polyphemus and you will soon see many of them flying around our Tropical Butterfly House. The common name for this creature, White Morpho, is obvious but the scientific species name is a bit more curious. Could this butterfly have been named for the character in Homer’s Odyssey? Polyphemus is the name of a one-eyed, man-eating giant on the island of Cyclops. What characteristics of Morpho polyphemus make this beautiful butterfly worthy of such a name?

In fact, many butterflies are given species names from Greek mythology: Eurypyle, Belus, Hecale, Ismenius, and Demophon just to name a few from this week’s Fresh Sheet. Look them up! Then ponder why the butterfly was so named. Perhaps the name has no hidden or descriptive meaning at all.

Bioproductores de El Salvador

10 – Anaea eurypyle (Pointed Leafwing)
10 – Anaea nobilis (Noble Leafwing)
10 – Archeoprepona demophoon (Hubner’s Prepona)
25 – Battus belus (Belus Swallowtail)
15 – Caligo memnon (Owl Butterfly)
20 – Catonephele numilia (Halloween Butterfly)
15 – Eurytides thymbraeus (White-crested Swallowtail)
12 – Heliconius hecale (Tiger Longwing)
20 – Heliconius hortense (Mountain Longwing)
15 – Heliconius ismenius (Ismenius Longwing)
75 – Morpho peleides (Blue Morpho)
50 – Morpho polyphemus (White Morpho)
20 – Papilio androgeus (Queen Page)
20 – Papilio erostratus (Dusky Swallowtail)
25 – Papilio pilumnus (Three-tailed Swallowtail)
30 – Papilio torquatus (Band-gapped Swallowtail)
25 – Archeoprepona demophon (One-spotted Prepona)
9 – Prepona omphale (Blue Belly-Button)
20 – Tithorea tarricina (Cream-Spotted Tigerwing)

Total = 441

“Fresh Sheet” is our weekly shipment report of pupae on display in the emerging window. Visit Pacific Science Center’s Tropical Butterfly House and meet our newest residents.

These butterflies typically arrive as pupae on the Thursday or Friday before the Fresh Sheet is published. Some of these butterflies will start emerging the day they arrive or the next day, but other species may take a full week before they reach adulthood. After emerging, they may live for a week or even a few months! While we love sharing a variety of species with our guests, we cannot guarantee that any specific species will be flying on the day that you visit Pacific Science Center.

If you are interested in photographing a specific butterfly and would like to be updated about when it is flying in the Tropical Butterfly House, please email Butterflies@pacsci.org with details and your contact information.

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Andy Jassy, Ceo, Amazon Web Services And Adriane Brown, President & Coo, Intellectual Ventures To Speak At Pacific Science Center’s Annual Fundraising Event https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/news/andy-jassy-adriane-brown-to-speak-at-annual-fundraising-event/ Tue, 21 Mar 2017 19:00:22 +0000 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/?p=15135 Andy Jassy, CEO, Amazon Web Services, Business Leader, Innovator and Adriane Brown, President and COO, Intellectual Ventures, Recognized Business Leader, Influencer, Mentor will join Pacific Science Center to keynote the 14th Annual Foundations of Science Breakfast— a morning of inspiring tomorrow's innovators throughout Washington state.

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PacSci Perspectives

14th Annual Foundations of Science Breakfast: Inspiring Tomorrow’s Innovators on May 17 at Marriott Waterfront

SEATTLE, WA (March 16, 2017) – Andy Jassy, CEO, Amazon Web Services, Business Leader, Innovator and Adriane Brown, President and COO, Intellectual Ventures, Recognized Business Leader, Influencer, Mentor will join Pacific Science Center to keynote the 14th Annual Foundations of Science Breakfast— a morning of inspiring tomorrow’s innovators throughout Washington state.

Imagine that in our lifetime, the next generation of inventors and innovators cure cancer, reverse climate change, end hunger, push the limits of time and space, and discover new frontiers. What else would be possible when we ignite curiosity in tomorrow’s innovators by fueling a passion for experimentation, discovery, and critical thinking through hands-on experiences today?

On May 17, Pacific Science Center will bring together leading Northwest business, civic, and philanthropic leaders, entrepreneurs and educators to celebrate these possibilities.

Registration and networking begin at 7 a.m. and the program will run from 7:30-9 a.m. at the Marriott Waterfront, Seattle.

To register, please visit pacificsciencecenter.org/breakfast. If you are interested in sponsorship levels for this event, please email kdej-panah@pacsci.org.

Limited press passes are available on a first-request, first-served basis. Please contact Katelyn Del Buco at kdelbuco@pacsci.org or (206) 269-5728 to inquire.

A not-for-profit institution, Pacific Science Center greatly appreciates the support of our sponsors for the Foundations of Science Breakfast. Thanks to their generosity, every contribution made at the event will directly support igniting curiosity in every child and fueling a passion for discovery, experimentation, and critical thinking in all of us. We are grateful for leadership support from our Dreamer sponsors, Intellectual Ventures, Battelle, and the newest member of the community, Kaiser Permanente. We welcome Kaiser Permanente and look forward to bringing science to life in the Northwest together.

Media partner: GeekWire

ABOUT PACIFIC SCIENCE CENTER

Pacific Science Center is an independent, not-for-profit institution in Seattle. The institution’s mission is to ignite curiosity in every child and to fuel a passion for discovery, experimentation, and critical thinking in all of us. Pacific Science Center’s award-winning, interactive programs reach more than 1.1 million people each year – in their communities, classrooms, and on the Seattle campus and at Mercer Slough Environmental Education Center. Pacific Science Center began as the United States Science Pavilion during the 1962 Seattle World’s Fair. Millions came to explore the wonders of science during the World’s Fair and upon closing ceremonies, the Science Pavilion was given new life as the private not-for-profit Pacific Science Center, becoming the first U.S. museum founded as a science and technology center. On July 22, 2010 Pacific Science Center was declared a City of Seattle Landmark.

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Fresh Sheet – March 18, 2017 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/life-sciences-blog/fresh-sheet-2017-03-18/ Sat, 18 Mar 2017 07:01:57 +0000 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/?p=15087 Here's what's new this week at Pacific Science Center's Tropical Butterfly House. Some butterflies' wings are differently colored on the inside than on the outside. Have you ever wondered why?

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PacSci Perspectives

Morpho peleides (Blue Morpho)

Morpho peleides (Blue Morpho)

Many species of butterflies show different coloration on the inside of their wings from the outside of their wings. Most commonly, the ventral wing view (the side that shows when the wings are folded) will either camouflage with their surroundings or mimic predators with such markings as large eyespots. The dorsal wing view (the side that shows when the wings are open) is often colorful and/or significant to other members of the species. These markings are shown during courtship and territorial displays. Next time you visit our Tropical Butterfly House check out the differently purposed wing colorations of the various species.

Suministros Entimológicos Costarricenses, SA
CRES Costa Rica

13 – Anteos chlorinde (White Angled Sulphur)
16 – Archeoprepona demophon (One-spotted Prepona)
28 – Caligo memnon (Owl Butterfly)
16 – Catonephele numilia (Numilia)
10 – Danaus plexippus (The Monarch)
16 – Dryadula phaetusa (Banded Orange Heliconian)
8 – Eryphanis polyxena (Purple Mort Bleu Owl)
26 – Greta oto (Glasswing)
16 – Hamadryas amphinome (Red Calico)
15 – Hamadryas laodamia (Starry Calico)
16 – Heliconius doris (Doris Longwing)
16 – Heliconius hecale (Tiger Longwing)
16 – Heliconius hewitsoni (Hewitson’s Longwing)
20 – Heliconius melpomene (Postman)
32 – Morpho peleides (Blue Morpho)
20 – Myscelia cyaniris (Blue Wave Butterfly)
16 – Papilio thoas (Thoas Swallowtail)
16 – Parides arcas (Arcas Cattleheart)
20 – Siproeta epaphus (Rusty-tipped Page)
16 – Siproeta stelenes (Malachite)

Total = 352

“Fresh Sheet” is our weekly shipment report of pupae on display in the emerging window. Visit Pacific Science Center’s Tropical Butterfly House and meet our newest residents.

These butterflies typically arrive as pupae on the Thursday or Friday before the Fresh Sheet is published. Some of these butterflies will start emerging the day they arrive or the next day, but other species may take a full week before they reach adulthood. After emerging, they may live for a week or even a few months! While we love sharing a variety of species with our guests, we cannot guarantee that any specific species will be flying on the day that you visit Pacific Science Center.

If you are interested in photographing a specific butterfly and would like to be updated about when it is flying in the Tropical Butterfly House, please email Butterflies@pacsci.org with details and your contact information.

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PacSci-Doku: “Earth-Like Worlds” https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/pacsci-doku/earth-like-worlds/ Thu, 16 Mar 2017 19:05:45 +0000 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/?p=15068 Pacific Science Center's latest science word puzzle is perhaps the most important search in the entire universe. At least to those of us on this planet. Can you solve the "Earth-Like Worlds" edition of PacSci-Doku?

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Pacific Science Center

Bringing science to life.

PacSci-Doku: “Earth-Like Worlds”

By Dennis Schatz – Senior Advisor

Do you Sudoku? It’s one of the hottest number games around! Well, here’s a twist we think you’ll love. We call it PacSci-Doku. Can you guess why? Here’s how it works. Instead of filling in the blanks with numbers, we use letters. Hidden in one of the columns or rows is the answer to a science question. You’ll find information about the answer on the answer tab below.

The question in this edition is:

What star was recently discovered to have 7 Earth-sized planets orbiting around it?

To find the answer, complete this PacSci-Doku using the following nine letters:

A  i  1  R  T  t  s  P  p

PacSci-Doku: Earth-Like Worlds

The Puzzle

Puzzle Difficulty: Medium

The Answer
PacSci-Doku: Earth-Like Worlds Answer

The Solution

The question in this edition is:

What star was recently discovered to have 7 Earth-sized planets orbiting around it?

The answer: Trappist 1

Astronomers have now confirmed that seven Earth-sized planets orbit the star Trappist 1, a star 40 light years away and only 1/12th the mass of our Sun. The planets all circle close to the star, resulting in much shorter orbital periods. The inner most planet makes it once around the star in 1.5 days, while the one farthest out takes 20 days. Another difference from our Solar System is that the temperature of Trappist 1, which is only 4,000 degrees Fahrenheit compared to the Sun’s 10,000 degrees. Being so close to the star means the planets are likely to be gravitationally locked, so that one side of the planets always faces the star – much like what has happened between Mercury and the Sun. Even with these unusual conditions, some of the planets may exist at distances where any water on the planets could be a liquid, and therefore support life. The next step is for astronomers to aim telescopes at the collection of planets to determine what gases exist in the planets’ atmospheres, which may indicate whether or not they could support life. Learn more about Trappist 1 and its family of plants.

 

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Animal Adoptions Update: Welcome Basil! https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/life-sciences-blog/animal-adoptions-update-welcome-basil/ Wed, 15 Mar 2017 16:56:47 +0000 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/?p=15037 We’re excited to announce that a fantastic new creature has moved into our iguana exhibit. Meet Basil, a very young green iguana.

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PacSci Perspectives

Iggy the iguana was Pacific Science Center’s first resident foster animal when Animal Care began an animal adoption program two years ago from Seattle Animal Shelter. In mid-January, Iggy found her forever home with a wonderful family. Since then, the iguana enclosure has remained vacant, waiting for the perfect replacement. Until now.

We’re excited to announce that a fantastic new creature has moved into the iguana exhibit. Meet Basil, a very young green iguana. Basil came to us as part of our partnership with the Pacific Northwest Herpetological Society, the group that provides us with adoptable box turtles. And like Iggy, as well as the box turtles that we exhibit, Basil is available for adoption.

Basil The Iguana

Be aware that at seven months old, Basil is very small, but could grow up to between five to seven feet in length with a life expectancy of up to 20 years! At this stage, Basil is too young for us to be able to determine whether this reptile is a boy or girl; secondary sex characteristics start showing themselves around a year and a half to two years of age. We would love to find a permanent home for Basil, but we’re excited to care for this gorgeous animal until then. Come visit our newest resident soon!

To learn more about the adoptable animals at Pacific Northwest Herpetological Society, including Basil, click here.

To learn more about the adoptable animals at Seattle Animal Shelter, click here.

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Fresh Sheet – March 11, 2017 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/life-sciences-blog/fresh-sheet-2017-03-11/ Sat, 11 Mar 2017 08:01:40 +0000 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/?p=14939 This week's pupae shipment contains a large number of Atlas moths (Attacus atlas). We separate the boy moths from the girl moths in our Tropical Butterfly House. Do you know why?

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PacSci Perspectives

Atlas Moth

Attacus atlas (Atlas Moth)

This week’s pupae shipment contains a large number of Atlas moths (Attacus atlas). Although these Lepidoptera are much loved and admired, this species presents special husbandry tasks for Animal Care staff.

Before they are pinned to emerge, Atlas moth pupae genders must first be determined and the cocoons segregated. We display male cocoons in the emerging window while females develop behind-the scenes. Once the moths emerge from their cocoons, our release procedure is to allow the male Atlas moths to fly free and confine the females to a netted “flight cage” that will also be displayed in our Tropical Butterfly House.

The rational for this practice is that female Atlas moths tend to lay their eggs wherever they land rather than on a specific host plant. By isolating them, we prevent unwanted caterpillars appearing in the garden. Confining female Atlas moths in the garden allows them to continue to send out their pheromone signals to the males. Ultimately, the male moths will recognize mates by using their great sense of smell with their feathery antennae.

Next time you visit our Tropical Butterfly House, look for the free-flying male Atlas moths and their “smelly” mates. It will be a treat!

Penang Butterfly Farm
Malaysia

50 – Attacus atlas (Atlas Moth)
15 – Catopsilia pomona (Lemon Emigrant)
45 – Catopsilia scylla (Orange Emigrant)
100 – Cethosia cyane (Leopard Lacewing)
2 – Graphium sarpedon (Common Bluebottle)
10 – Hypolimnas bolina (Blue moon)
40 – Idea leuconoe (Paper Kite)
100 – Parthenos sylvia (The Clipper)
13 – Precis almanac (Peacock Pansy)
50 – Tirumala septentrionus (Dark Blue Tiger)
5 – Vindula dejone (The Cruiser)

Total = 430

Neotropical Insects NV
Suriname

30 – Battus belus (Belus Swallowtail)
25 – Heraclides anchisiades (Ruby-spotted Swallowtail)
40 – Heliconius melpomene (Postman)
10 – Heliconius doris (Doris Longwing)
10 – Dryas iulia (Julia Longwing)
25 – Catonephele orites (Orange-banded Shoemaker)
45 – Anartia amathea (Scarlet Peacock)
5 – Hamadryas feronia (Variable Calico)
10 – Archeoprepona demophoon (Hubner’s Prepona)
5 – Biblis hyperia (Red Rim)
15 – Caligo memnon (Owl Butterfly)
40 – Mechanitis polymnia (Polymnia Tigerwing)
40 – Tithorea harmonia (Harmonia Tigerwing)

Total = 300
Grand Total = 730

 

“Fresh Sheet” is our weekly shipment report of pupae on display in the emerging window. Visit Pacific Science Center’s Tropical Butterfly House and meet our newest residents.

These butterflies typically arrive as pupae on the Thursday or Friday before the Fresh Sheet is published. Some of these butterflies will start emerging the day they arrive or the next day, but other species may take a full week before they reach adulthood. After emerging, they may live for a week or even a few months! While we love sharing a variety of species with our guests, we cannot guarantee that any specific species will be flying on the day that you visit Pacific Science Center.

If you are interested in photographing a specific butterfly and would like to be updated about when it is flying in the Tropical Butterfly House, please email Butterflies@pacsci.org with details and your contact information.

The post Fresh Sheet – March 11, 2017 appeared first on Pacific Science Center.

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To Dream Big, Go Small: Avery Bang’s Simple Genius https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/news/dream-big-go-small-avery-bangs-simple-genius/ Sat, 11 Mar 2017 02:25:24 +0000 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/?p=14925 Meet Avery Bang, an engineer building bridges across the world.

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PacSci Perspectives

Some of the greatest works of engineering are simple. Meet Avery Bang, an engineer building bridges across the world. Though offered a better paying, more prestigious job, she chose to go abroad and create sustainable, simple bridges that offer communities greater opportunities.

Avery has been doing humanitarian work since she was a child. As the daughter of a civil engineer, she grew up participating in on public works projects with her family, so her understanding of engineering as a service began at a young age. But her decision to dedicate her working life to simple, humanitarian projects began when she was working on a Fijian island, constructing foot bridges for locals.

This work is what ultimately inspired Avery to focus on building simple, sustainable technology for impoverished peoples. This took her to Haiti. The village she came to was blocked off from the main town by a large river. Locals couldn’t get medical supplies and children couldn’t go to school without crossing it. At least one person drowns per year, according to locals. Avery knew there were many ways to help, including importing materials and bringing in foreign engineers. She also knew, however, that this bridge would have to be something sustainable. Could these villagers afford to import materials if the bridge needed repairs? Who would repair it in an emergency? Avery built a footbridge using local materials, local engineers and used a simple enough that non-engineers in the village could repair it. Even after the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, locals were able to repair the bridge. It is still in use today!

Avery is now the CEO of Bridges to Prosperity (B2P), where she started as a volunteer in 2006. She teaches Cable Supported Pedestrian Bridge Design at the University of Colorado. She has been recognized by the Engineer News Record (ENR) and American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) for her work, and is studying to receive her MBA at Oxford University. As CEO of B2P, she continues her engineering work.

Learn more about Avery’s work in Dream Big: Engineering Our World 3D, now screening in our Boeing IMAX Theater.

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Development Intern (unpaid) https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/volunteer/development-intern-20170306/ Mon, 06 Mar 2017 15:50:09 +0000 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/?p=14761 The post Development Intern (unpaid) appeared first on Pacific Science Center.

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Pacific Science Center

Bringing science to life.

Pacific Science Center brings science to life. Our award-winning, interactive programs reach more than 1.3 million people around the state each year — in their communities, classrooms and on our campus. We offer a wide variety of exhibits and programs, including standards-based formal and informal science education programs and an award-winning environmental education center.

Much of the funding for these and other Science Center activities come from grants, sponsorships and personal gifts stewarded by our talented Development team. The Development Intern will support the efforts of the Individual Giving team to grow and sustain a donor-centered fundraising program. The intern will receive direction from the Director of Individual Giving.

Reports To: Director of Individual Giving
Position Start Date: as early as April 2017
Position End Date: from June to August 2017 (Internship can be 3 – 6 months long)
Schedule: Flexible, 15 – 20 hours per week

Job Duties

  • Support donor event logistics, collateral, and on-site customer service.
  • Assist donors by directing phone and email inquiries.
  • Prepare donor profiles in advance of upcoming events, visits, and strategy meetings.
  • Research Workplace Giving, Sustaining Giving, Young Professional, and Planned Giving Programs to support strategy and planning for future campaigns.
  • Work collaboratively with Development team and other Science Center staff to perform other duties as assigned.

Learning Opportunities

  • Strengthen communication skills through diverse interactions with a variety of Science Center staff and donors.
  • Demonstrate leadership skills while working in a team environment.
  • Gain insight into the inner-workings of a successful Development team with a demanding workload.
  • Learn about the function and purpose of prospect research including how to create a formal donor profile.
  • Broaden understanding of a variety of Annual Giving vehicles and learn how to apply industry-wide best practices into organizational strategy.
  • It may be possible to address additional learning objectives during the course of the internship. Should an interview be extended to a candidate, we welcome a discussion of personal educational goals.

Position Requirements

  • Current college or graduate students with an interest in non-profit development work
  • Strong skills in writing, editing and producing high quality documents
  • Must be highly organized and be detail oriented
  • Enthusiasm for learning about Pacific Science Center’s mission, programs and the workings of a not-for-profit organization
  • Ability to work cooperatively and considerately with other people
  • Ability to make a commitment to see the project through
  • Must be able to provide three references (at least 1 professional) and pass a national background check

Benefits

  • Membership during your internship
  • Bus or parking passes on the days you volunteer
  • Opportunity to share your knowledge and skills
  • Add to your resume and explore new careers
  • Elevate your current skill set and showcase your talent
  • Expand your network of contacts and raise your visibility
  • Experience leadership and be part of a great team

TO APPLY: Email a cover letter and resume to volunteers@pacsci.org with the title “Development Intern” in the subject line.


Pacific Science Center

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Explore The Arctic At Pacific Science Center’s Polar Science Weekend https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/news/polar-science-weekend-2017/ Wed, 01 Mar 2017 22:22:48 +0000 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/?p=14568 Explore The Arctic At Pacific Science Center's Polar Science Weekend. NASA to join as featured exhibitor, March 3-5, 2017.

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PacSci Perspectives

NASA to join as featured exhibitor, March 3-5, 2017

SEATTLE, WA (March 1, 2017) — Take a scientific journey to the ends of the earth at Pacific Science Center’s next Curiosity Days: Polar Science Weekend, March 3-5. Investigate a real ice core from Greenland, eavesdrop underwater on the sounds of whales and tour an actual Arctic Ice Camp that polar researchers call home; all with the guidance of scientists in the field.

Presented in partnership with the University of Washington’s Applied Physics Laboratory, Polar Science Weekend brings current research from some of the most scientifically impactful regions of our planet to Pacific Science Center with interactive exhibits and opportunities to talk with some of the nation’s top polar scientists who have worked in this rigorous climate.

This year NASA is joining in on the fun and will be exhibiting a model of its ICESat-2 (Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite-2), which launches in 2018. It measures the height and thickness of sea and land ice, as well as estimate global vegetation mass. Guests will be able to stand under the model and have their height measured.

Photon Jump, a 3-minute movie describing how this technology works, will be premiering at Polar Science Weekend. In the film, a brave photon of light named Pho must travel from a NASA spacecraft down to Earth and back again to help complete a crucial science (climate change) mission. The animation was produced through an education partnership between NASA and students from the Savannah College of Art and Design. The idea of the film is to pique interest into learning more about the mission’s objectives to use lasers to measure the melting of ice sheets and sea ice from space.

In addition to NASA’s ICESat-2, they’ll be facilitating two activities:

  • “Motion in the Ocean” Experiments – Explore how water moves throughout the ocean with this hands-on activity, which uses colored saltwater and freshwater in recycled tennis-ball tubes. The experiment demonstrates how fluids move depending on their densities — see for yourself what happens when you pour fresh water on top of salt water in a tube. This is similar to what happens when sea ice melts in the Arctic or Antarctic Ocean, since the ice is less salty than the ocean water.
  • ICESat-2 Bouncy Ball Photon Collection Activity – Teams will use green bouncy balls, representing particles of light, to experience what a difficult job ICESat-2 has as the NASA satellite measures the height of our planet. A group will bounce these “photons” off different surfaces and try to collect them, just as the satellite sends down and collects laser photons.

“We’re thrilled to share hands-on activities during the Polar Weekend, and introduce visitors to the world of NASA’s polar research,” said Valerie Casasanto, outreach lead for the ICESat-2 mission at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. “This is also a chance for guests to get the first look at our animated ‘Photon Jump’ short film, which will premier during the Polar Weekend.”

Scientists and researchers will be joined by the U.S. Coast Guard and Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium to highlight unique and engaging activities.

Demonstrations include:

  • Extreme Cold
  • Antarctica Under the Ice
  • Arctic Marine Mammals
  • Keep It Cool for Polar Bears
  • Living and Working in Antarctica

Activities include:

  • Salinity taste tests
  • Discovering Polar Science Technology
  • Sea Ice vs. Freshwater Ice
  • Polar Detectives

Polar Science Weekend is a partnership between Pacific Science Center and the University of Washington’s Polar Science Center, Applied Physics Laboratory. Generously sponsored by PEMCO.

Polar Science Weekend is presented as part of Curiosity Days, Pacific Science Center’s monthly program where guests of all ages are invited to explore a different theme each month through hands-on activities and presentations by local experts, as well as featured IMAX® movies, stage shows and more. More information can be obtained at pacsci.org/curiosity-days.

About Pacific Science Center

Pacific Science Center is an independent, not-for-profit institution in Seattle. The institution’s mission is to ignite curiosity in every child and to fuel a passion for discovery, experimentation, and critical thinking in all of us. Pacific Science Center’s award-winning, interactive programs reach more than 1.1 million people each year – in their communities, classrooms, and on the Seattle campus and at Mercer Slough Environmental Education Center. Pacific Science Center began as the United States Science Pavilion during the 1962 Seattle World’s Fair. Millions came to explore the wonders of science during the World’s Fair and upon closing ceremonies, the Science Pavilion was given new life as the private not-for-profit Pacific Science Center, becoming the first U.S. museum founded as a science and technology center. On July 22, 2010 Pacific Science Center was declared a City of Seattle Landmark.

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