Pacific Science Center https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org Thu, 22 Feb 2018 01:21:21 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/pacsci-site-icon-320x320-150x150.jpg Pacific Science Center https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org 32 32 Fresh Sheet – February 17, 2018 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/life-sciences-blog/fresh-sheet-2018-02-17/ Sat, 17 Feb 2018 08:01:41 +0000 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/?p=22738 Danaus plexippus (The Monarch) star of "Flight of the Butterflies 3D"

[et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" fullwidth="on" specialty="off" background_image="https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/header-ethernet-cables-1280x2921.jpg" transparent_background="off" allow_player_pause="off" inner_shadow="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" padding_mobile="off" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" make_equal="off" use_custom_gutter="off" custom_padding_tablet="50px|0|50px|0" custom_padding_last_edited="on|desktop" next_background_color="#000000" global_module="7474"][et_pb_fullwidth_header admin_label="PacSci Perspectives" global_parent="7474" title="PacSci Perspectives" background_layout="dark" text_orientation="left" header_fullscreen="off" header_scroll_down="off" content_orientation="center" image_orientation="center" subhead_font="|on|||" custom_button_one="off" button_one_icon_placement="right" custom_button_two="off" button_two_icon_placement="right" title_text_color="#ffffff" subhead_text_color="#ffffff" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial" _builder_version="3.0.95" max_width_tablet="50px" /][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" prev_background_color="#000000"][et_pb_row admin_label="row"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][et_pb_post_title admin_label="Post Title - DON'T EDIT THIS" title="on" meta="on" author="on" date="on" categories="off" comments="off" featured_image="off" featured_placement="below" parallax_effect="on" parallax_method="on" text_orientation="left" text_color="dark" text_background="off" text_bg_color="rgba(255,255,255,0.9)" module_bg_color="rgba(255,255,255,0)" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" /][et_pb_text admin_label="Body of Page - Text" background_layout="light" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.101"]

[caption id="attachment_22736" align="alignnone" width="1920"]Danaus plexippus (The Monarch) star of "Flight of the Butterflies 3D" Danaus plexippus (The Monarch) star of "Flight of the Butterflies 3D"[/caption]

This week's pupae shipment from Costa Rica contains 65 Danaus plexippus (The Monarch) butterflies, the star of the IMAX movie "Flight of the Butterflies 3D now showing at Pacific Science Center. This popular film is back to tell the story of Dr. Fred Urquhart's 40-year research into Monarch butterfly migration. It's a great detective story!

After viewing the movie, be sure to visit our Tropical Butterfly House and perhaps watch a butterfly emerge from its chrysalis in the Emerging Window or see if you can spot them flying from flower to flower. Be assured that like all the butterflies we acquire, the Monarchs we get are sustainably farmed and therefore are not taken from a wild, migrating population. So come, relax, and enjoy the shows!

Suministros EntimolXgicos Costarricenses, SA
CRES, Costa Rica

15 - Adelpha fessonia (Mexican Sister)
5 - Caligo atreus (Yellow-Edged Giant-Owl)
14 - Caligo eurilochus (Forest Giant Owl)
7 - Caligo memnon (Owl Butterfly)
36 - Catonephele numilia (Grecian Shoemaker)
65 - Danaus plexippus (The Monarch)
20 - Greta oto (Glasswing)
8 - Hamadryas laodamia (Starry Calico)
55 - Heliconius cydno (Cydno Longwing)
10 - Heliconius hecale (Tiger Longwing)
9 - Heliconius hewitsoni (Hewitson's Longwing)
10 - Heliconius melpomene (Postman)
33 - Morpho peleides (Peleides Blue Morpho)
25 - Myscelia cyaniris (Blue Wave Butterfly)
13 - Papilio thoas (Thoas Swallowtail)
10 - Siproeta epaphus (Rusty-tipped Page)
23 - Siproeta stelenes (Malachite)

Total = 358

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Boilerplate material - Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

"Fresh Sheet" is our weekly shipment report of pupae on display in the emerging window. Visit Pacific Science Center's Tropical Butterfly House and meet our newest residents.

These butterflies typically arrive as pupae on the Thursday or Friday before the Fresh Sheet is published. Some of these butterflies will start emerging the day they arrive or the next day, but other species may take a full week before they reach adulthood. After emerging, they may live for a week or even a few months! While we love sharing a variety of species with our guests, we cannot guarantee that any specific species will be flying on the day that you visit Pacific Science Center.

If you are interested in photographing a specific butterfly and would like to be updated about when it is flying in the Tropical Butterfly House, please email Butterflies@pacsci.org with details and your contact information.

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

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[et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" fullwidth="on" specialty="off" background_image="https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/header-ethernet-cables-1280x2921.jpg" transparent_background="off" allow_player_pause="off" inner_shadow="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" padding_mobile="off" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" make_equal="off" use_custom_gutter="off" custom_padding_tablet="50px|0|50px|0" custom_padding_last_edited="on|desktop" next_background_color="#000000" global_module="7474"][et_pb_fullwidth_header admin_label="PacSci Perspectives" global_parent="7474" title="PacSci Perspectives" background_layout="dark" text_orientation="left" header_fullscreen="off" header_scroll_down="off" content_orientation="center" image_orientation="center" subhead_font="|on|||" custom_button_one="off" button_one_icon_placement="right" custom_button_two="off" button_two_icon_placement="right" title_text_color="#ffffff" subhead_text_color="#ffffff" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial" _builder_version="3.0.95" max_width_tablet="50px" /][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" prev_background_color="#000000"][et_pb_row admin_label="row"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][et_pb_post_title admin_label="Post Title - DON'T EDIT THIS" title="on" meta="on" author="on" date="on" categories="off" comments="off" featured_image="off" featured_placement="below" parallax_effect="on" parallax_method="on" text_orientation="left" text_color="dark" text_background="off" text_bg_color="rgba(255,255,255,0.9)" module_bg_color="rgba(255,255,255,0)" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" /][et_pb_text admin_label="Body of Page - Text" background_layout="light" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.101"] [caption id="attachment_22736" align="alignnone" width="1920"]Danaus plexippus (The Monarch) star of "Flight of the Butterflies 3D" Danaus plexippus (The Monarch) star of "Flight of the Butterflies 3D"[/caption] This week's pupae shipment from Costa Rica contains 65 Danaus plexippus (The Monarch) butterflies, the star of the IMAX movie "Flight of the Butterflies 3D now showing at Pacific Science Center. This popular film is back to tell the story of Dr. Fred Urquhart's 40-year research into Monarch butterfly migration. It's a great detective story! After viewing the movie, be sure to visit our Tropical Butterfly House and perhaps watch a butterfly emerge from its chrysalis in the Emerging Window or see if you can spot them flying from flower to flower. Be assured that like all the butterflies we acquire, the Monarchs we get are sustainably farmed and therefore are not taken from a wild, migrating population. So come, relax, and enjoy the shows! Suministros EntimolXgicos Costarricenses, SA CRES, Costa Rica 15 - Adelpha fessonia (Mexican Sister) 5 - Caligo atreus (Yellow-Edged Giant-Owl) 14 - Caligo eurilochus (Forest Giant Owl) 7 - Caligo memnon (Owl Butterfly) 36 - Catonephele numilia (Grecian Shoemaker) 65 - Danaus plexippus (The Monarch) 20 - Greta oto (Glasswing) 8 - Hamadryas laodamia (Starry Calico) 55 - Heliconius cydno (Cydno Longwing) 10 - Heliconius hecale (Tiger Longwing) 9 - Heliconius hewitsoni (Hewitson's Longwing) 10 - Heliconius melpomene (Postman) 33 - Morpho peleides (Peleides Blue Morpho) 25 - Myscelia cyaniris (Blue Wave Butterfly) 13 - Papilio thoas (Thoas Swallowtail) 10 - Siproeta epaphus (Rusty-tipped Page) 23 - Siproeta stelenes (Malachite) Total = 358 [/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Boilerplate material - Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"] "Fresh Sheet" is our weekly shipment report of pupae on display in the emerging window. Visit Pacific Science Center's Tropical Butterfly House and meet our newest residents. These butterflies typically arrive as pupae on the Thursday or Friday before the Fresh Sheet is published. Some of these butterflies will start emerging the day they arrive or the next day, but other species may take a full week before they reach adulthood. After emerging, they may live for a week or even a few months! While we love sharing a variety of species with our guests, we cannot guarantee that any specific species will be flying on the day that you visit Pacific Science Center. If you are interested in photographing a specific butterfly and would like to be updated about when it is flying in the Tropical Butterfly House, please email Butterflies@pacsci.org with details and your contact information. [/et_pb_text][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

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PacSci Podcast: Wild Weather Week https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/pacsci-podcast/wild-weather-week-2018/ Fri, 16 Feb 2018 20:28:46 +0000 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/?p=22760 Wild Weather Week

[et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" fullwidth="on" specialty="off" background_image="https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/header-ethernet-cables-1280x2921.jpg" transparent_background="off" allow_player_pause="off" inner_shadow="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" padding_mobile="off" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" make_equal="off" use_custom_gutter="off" custom_padding_tablet="50px|0|50px|0" custom_padding_last_edited="on|desktop" next_background_color="#ffffff" global_module="7474" prev_background_color="#000000"][et_pb_fullwidth_header admin_label="PacSci Perspectives" global_parent="7474" title="PacSci Perspectives" background_layout="dark" text_orientation="left" header_fullscreen="off" header_scroll_down="off" content_orientation="center" image_orientation="center" subhead_font="|on|||" custom_button_one="off" button_one_icon_placement="right" custom_button_two="off" button_two_icon_placement="right" title_text_color="#ffffff" subhead_text_color="#ffffff" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial" _builder_version="3.0.95" max_width_tablet="50px" /][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" prev_background_color="#000000"][et_pb_row admin_label="row" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" _builder_version="3.0.51" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][et_pb_post_title admin_label="Post Title - DON'T EDIT THIS" title="on" meta="on" author="on" date="on" categories="off" comments="off" featured_image="off" featured_placement="below" parallax_effect="on" parallax_method="on" text_orientation="left" text_color="dark" text_background="off" module_bg_color="rgba(255,255,255,0)" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.51" parallax="on" background_color="rgba(255,255,255,0)" /][et_pb_text admin_label="Body of Story - EDIT THIS IF NEED BE" background_layout="light" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.102"]

Wild Weather Week

At this time of year around the Northwest, our weather can get pretty crazy. Snow one minute, sunshine the next. So, Pacific Science Center decided to devote an entire week to it.

We call it Wild Weather Week, February 19-25.

Give a listen to this quick PacSci Podcast then round up every weather question you've ever had an make plans to join us. Learn More

 

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Embedded Podcast - Text" background_layout="light" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.102"]

https://soundcloud.com/pacsci/wild-weather-week-2018

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" _builder_version="3.0.51" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

The post PacSci Podcast: Wild Weather Week appeared first on Pacific Science Center.

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[et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" fullwidth="on" specialty="off" background_image="https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/header-ethernet-cables-1280x2921.jpg" transparent_background="off" allow_player_pause="off" inner_shadow="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" padding_mobile="off" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" make_equal="off" use_custom_gutter="off" custom_padding_tablet="50px|0|50px|0" custom_padding_last_edited="on|desktop" next_background_color="#ffffff" global_module="7474" prev_background_color="#000000"][et_pb_fullwidth_header admin_label="PacSci Perspectives" global_parent="7474" title="PacSci Perspectives" background_layout="dark" text_orientation="left" header_fullscreen="off" header_scroll_down="off" content_orientation="center" image_orientation="center" subhead_font="|on|||" custom_button_one="off" button_one_icon_placement="right" custom_button_two="off" button_two_icon_placement="right" title_text_color="#ffffff" subhead_text_color="#ffffff" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial" _builder_version="3.0.95" max_width_tablet="50px" /][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" prev_background_color="#000000"][et_pb_row admin_label="row" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" _builder_version="3.0.51" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][et_pb_post_title admin_label="Post Title - DON'T EDIT THIS" title="on" meta="on" author="on" date="on" categories="off" comments="off" featured_image="off" featured_placement="below" parallax_effect="on" parallax_method="on" text_orientation="left" text_color="dark" text_background="off" module_bg_color="rgba(255,255,255,0)" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.51" parallax="on" background_color="rgba(255,255,255,0)" /][et_pb_text admin_label="Body of Story - EDIT THIS IF NEED BE" background_layout="light" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.102"] Wild Weather Week At this time of year around the Northwest, our weather can get pretty crazy. Snow one minute, sunshine the next. So, Pacific Science Center decided to devote an entire week to it. We call it Wild Weather Week, February 19-25. Give a listen to this quick PacSci Podcast then round up every weather question you've ever had an make plans to join us. Learn More   [/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Embedded Podcast - Text" background_layout="light" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.102"] https://soundcloud.com/pacsci/wild-weather-week-2018 [/et_pb_text][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" _builder_version="3.0.51" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

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Help Fight Winter’s Gloom https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/pacsci-podcast/help-fight-winters-gloom/ Thu, 15 Feb 2018 22:56:25 +0000 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/?p=22723

[et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" fullwidth="on" specialty="off" background_image="https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/header-ethernet-cables-1280x2921.jpg" transparent_background="off" allow_player_pause="off" inner_shadow="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" padding_mobile="off" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" make_equal="off" use_custom_gutter="off" custom_padding_tablet="50px|0|50px|0" custom_padding_last_edited="on|desktop" next_background_color="#ffffff" global_module="7474" prev_background_color="#000000"][et_pb_fullwidth_header admin_label="PacSci Perspectives" global_parent="7474" title="PacSci Perspectives" background_layout="dark" text_orientation="left" header_fullscreen="off" header_scroll_down="off" content_orientation="center" image_orientation="center" subhead_font="|on|||" custom_button_one="off" button_one_icon_placement="right" custom_button_two="off" button_two_icon_placement="right" title_text_color="#ffffff" subhead_text_color="#ffffff" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial" _builder_version="3.0.95" max_width_tablet="50px" /][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" prev_background_color="#000000"][et_pb_row admin_label="row" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" _builder_version="3.0.51" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][et_pb_post_title admin_label="Post Title - DON'T EDIT THIS" title="on" meta="on" author="on" date="on" categories="off" comments="off" featured_image="off" featured_placement="below" parallax_effect="on" parallax_method="on" text_orientation="left" text_color="dark" text_background="off" module_bg_color="rgba(255,255,255,0)" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.51" parallax="on" background_color="rgba(255,255,255,0)" /][et_pb_text admin_label="Body of Story - EDIT THIS IF NEED BE" background_layout="light" _builder_version="3.0.101"]

Winters in the U.S. Pacific Northwest can get a little gloomy. OK, downright dismal for many of us tired of the wet, dark, cold weather. So, what can we do?

How about some gardening?

Now, before you say 'it's too cold to garden,' give a listen to this quick PacSci Podcast. Then stop by for a stroll through our indoor and outdoor gardens. They're inspiring for all of us home gardeners.

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Embedded Podcast - Text" background_layout="light" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.101"]

https://soundcloud.com/pacsci/help-fight-winters-gloom

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" _builder_version="3.0.51" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

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[et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" fullwidth="on" specialty="off" background_image="https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/header-ethernet-cables-1280x2921.jpg" transparent_background="off" allow_player_pause="off" inner_shadow="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" padding_mobile="off" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" make_equal="off" use_custom_gutter="off" custom_padding_tablet="50px|0|50px|0" custom_padding_last_edited="on|desktop" next_background_color="#ffffff" global_module="7474" prev_background_color="#000000"][et_pb_fullwidth_header admin_label="PacSci Perspectives" global_parent="7474" title="PacSci Perspectives" background_layout="dark" text_orientation="left" header_fullscreen="off" header_scroll_down="off" content_orientation="center" image_orientation="center" subhead_font="|on|||" custom_button_one="off" button_one_icon_placement="right" custom_button_two="off" button_two_icon_placement="right" title_text_color="#ffffff" subhead_text_color="#ffffff" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial" _builder_version="3.0.95" max_width_tablet="50px" /][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" prev_background_color="#000000"][et_pb_row admin_label="row" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" _builder_version="3.0.51" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][et_pb_post_title admin_label="Post Title - DON'T EDIT THIS" title="on" meta="on" author="on" date="on" categories="off" comments="off" featured_image="off" featured_placement="below" parallax_effect="on" parallax_method="on" text_orientation="left" text_color="dark" text_background="off" module_bg_color="rgba(255,255,255,0)" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.51" parallax="on" background_color="rgba(255,255,255,0)" /][et_pb_text admin_label="Body of Story - EDIT THIS IF NEED BE" background_layout="light" _builder_version="3.0.101"] Winters in the U.S. Pacific Northwest can get a little gloomy. OK, downright dismal for many of us tired of the wet, dark, cold weather. So, what can we do? How about some gardening? Now, before you say 'it's too cold to garden,' give a listen to this quick PacSci Podcast. Then stop by for a stroll through our indoor and outdoor gardens. They're inspiring for all of us home gardeners. [/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Embedded Podcast - Text" background_layout="light" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.101"] https://soundcloud.com/pacsci/help-fight-winters-gloom [/et_pb_text][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" _builder_version="3.0.51" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

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Fresh Sheet – February 10, 2018 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/life-sciences-blog/fresh-sheet-2018-02-10/ Sat, 10 Feb 2018 08:01:34 +0000 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/?p=22612 Morpho achilles (Blue-banded Morpho)

[et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" fullwidth="on" specialty="off" background_image="https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/header-ethernet-cables-1280x2921.jpg" transparent_background="off" allow_player_pause="off" inner_shadow="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" padding_mobile="off" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" make_equal="off" use_custom_gutter="off" custom_padding_tablet="50px|0|50px|0" custom_padding_last_edited="on|desktop" global_module="7474" next_background_color="#000000"][et_pb_fullwidth_header admin_label="PacSci Perspectives" global_parent="7474" title="PacSci Perspectives" background_layout="dark" text_orientation="left" header_fullscreen="off" header_scroll_down="off" content_orientation="center" image_orientation="center" subhead_font="|on|||" custom_button_one="off" button_one_icon_placement="right" custom_button_two="off" button_two_icon_placement="right" title_text_color="#ffffff" subhead_text_color="#ffffff" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial" _builder_version="3.0.95" max_width_tablet="50px" /][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" prev_background_color="#000000"][et_pb_row admin_label="row"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][et_pb_post_title admin_label="Post Title - DON'T EDIT THIS" title="on" meta="on" author="on" date="on" categories="off" comments="off" featured_image="off" featured_placement="below" parallax_effect="on" parallax_method="on" text_orientation="left" text_color="dark" text_background="off" text_bg_color="rgba(255,255,255,0.9)" module_bg_color="rgba(255,255,255,0)" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" /][et_pb_text admin_label="Body of Page - Text" background_layout="light" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.101"]

[caption id="attachment_22610" align="aligncenter" width="1920"]Morpho achilles (Blue-banded Morpho) Morpho achilles (Blue-banded Morpho)[/caption]

Most guests fall in love with Blue Morpho butterflies without realizing that the term refers to a group of butterflies, not a specific species. In fact, the genus Morpho contains over 175 species and subspecies from which we receive four. Morpho peleides, our most common Blue Morpho, is also known as the Peleides Blue Morpho or Common Morpho. This week's shipment from Suriname contains the stunning Morpho achilles (Blue-banded Morpho) that displays distinctive black and blue bands on the dorsal surfaces of their wings. Can you spot both of them on your next visit to the Tropical Butterfly House? Stop by and check them out!

Neotropical Insects NV
Suriname

16 - Battus polydamas (Polydamus Swallowtail)
10 - Heraclides thoas (Thoas Swallowtail)
20 - Heraclides anchisiades (Ruby-spotted Swallowtail)
20 - Heliconius melpomene (Postman)
30 - Dryas iulia (Julia Longwing)
40 - Agraulis vanilla (Gulf Fritllary)
14 - Catonephele orites (Orange-banded Shoemaker)
20 - Anartia amathea (Scarlet Peacock)
10 - Archeoprepona demophoon (Hubner's Prepona)
40 - Caligo memnon (Owl Butterfly)
10 - Eryphanis polyxena (Purple Mort Bleu Owl)
10 - Mechanitis polymnia (Polymnia Tigerwing)
40 - Tithorea harmonia (Harmonia Tigerwing)
20 - Morpho achilles (Blue-banded Morpho)

Total = 300

 

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Boilerplate material - Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

"Fresh Sheet" is our weekly shipment report of pupae on display in the emerging window. Visit Pacific Science Center's Tropical Butterfly House and meet our newest residents.

These butterflies typically arrive as pupae on the Thursday or Friday before the Fresh Sheet is published. Some of these butterflies will start emerging the day they arrive or the next day, but other species may take a full week before they reach adulthood. After emerging, they may live for a week or even a few months! While we love sharing a variety of species with our guests, we cannot guarantee that any specific species will be flying on the day that you visit Pacific Science Center.

If you are interested in photographing a specific butterfly and would like to be updated about when it is flying in the Tropical Butterfly House, please email Butterflies@pacsci.org with details and your contact information.

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

The post Fresh Sheet – February 10, 2018 appeared first on Pacific Science Center.

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[et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" fullwidth="on" specialty="off" background_image="https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/header-ethernet-cables-1280x2921.jpg" transparent_background="off" allow_player_pause="off" inner_shadow="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" padding_mobile="off" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" make_equal="off" use_custom_gutter="off" custom_padding_tablet="50px|0|50px|0" custom_padding_last_edited="on|desktop" global_module="7474" next_background_color="#000000"][et_pb_fullwidth_header admin_label="PacSci Perspectives" global_parent="7474" title="PacSci Perspectives" background_layout="dark" text_orientation="left" header_fullscreen="off" header_scroll_down="off" content_orientation="center" image_orientation="center" subhead_font="|on|||" custom_button_one="off" button_one_icon_placement="right" custom_button_two="off" button_two_icon_placement="right" title_text_color="#ffffff" subhead_text_color="#ffffff" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial" _builder_version="3.0.95" max_width_tablet="50px" /][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" prev_background_color="#000000"][et_pb_row admin_label="row"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][et_pb_post_title admin_label="Post Title - DON'T EDIT THIS" title="on" meta="on" author="on" date="on" categories="off" comments="off" featured_image="off" featured_placement="below" parallax_effect="on" parallax_method="on" text_orientation="left" text_color="dark" text_background="off" text_bg_color="rgba(255,255,255,0.9)" module_bg_color="rgba(255,255,255,0)" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" /][et_pb_text admin_label="Body of Page - Text" background_layout="light" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.101"] [caption id="attachment_22610" align="aligncenter" width="1920"]Morpho achilles (Blue-banded Morpho) Morpho achilles (Blue-banded Morpho)[/caption] Most guests fall in love with Blue Morpho butterflies without realizing that the term refers to a group of butterflies, not a specific species. In fact, the genus Morpho contains over 175 species and subspecies from which we receive four. Morpho peleides, our most common Blue Morpho, is also known as the Peleides Blue Morpho or Common Morpho. This week's shipment from Suriname contains the stunning Morpho achilles (Blue-banded Morpho) that displays distinctive black and blue bands on the dorsal surfaces of their wings. Can you spot both of them on your next visit to the Tropical Butterfly House? Stop by and check them out! Neotropical Insects NV Suriname 16 - Battus polydamas (Polydamus Swallowtail) 10 - Heraclides thoas (Thoas Swallowtail) 20 - Heraclides anchisiades (Ruby-spotted Swallowtail) 20 - Heliconius melpomene (Postman) 30 - Dryas iulia (Julia Longwing) 40 - Agraulis vanilla (Gulf Fritllary) 14 - Catonephele orites (Orange-banded Shoemaker) 20 - Anartia amathea (Scarlet Peacock) 10 - Archeoprepona demophoon (Hubner's Prepona) 40 - Caligo memnon (Owl Butterfly) 10 - Eryphanis polyxena (Purple Mort Bleu Owl) 10 - Mechanitis polymnia (Polymnia Tigerwing) 40 - Tithorea harmonia (Harmonia Tigerwing) 20 - Morpho achilles (Blue-banded Morpho) Total = 300   [/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Boilerplate material - Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"] "Fresh Sheet" is our weekly shipment report of pupae on display in the emerging window. Visit Pacific Science Center's Tropical Butterfly House and meet our newest residents. These butterflies typically arrive as pupae on the Thursday or Friday before the Fresh Sheet is published. Some of these butterflies will start emerging the day they arrive or the next day, but other species may take a full week before they reach adulthood. After emerging, they may live for a week or even a few months! While we love sharing a variety of species with our guests, we cannot guarantee that any specific species will be flying on the day that you visit Pacific Science Center. If you are interested in photographing a specific butterfly and would like to be updated about when it is flying in the Tropical Butterfly House, please email Butterflies@pacsci.org with details and your contact information. [/et_pb_text][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

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PacSci DIY: Camps Edition Squishy Circuits https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/pacsci-stories/pacsci-diy-camps-edition-squishy-circuits/ Wed, 07 Feb 2018 20:33:06 +0000 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/?p=22573 PacSci DIY: Squishy Circuits

[et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" fullwidth="on" specialty="off" background_image="https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/header-ethernet-cables-1280x2921.jpg" transparent_background="off" allow_player_pause="off" inner_shadow="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" padding_mobile="off" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" make_equal="off" use_custom_gutter="off" custom_padding_tablet="50px|0|50px|0" custom_padding_last_edited="on|desktop" global_module="7474"][et_pb_fullwidth_header admin_label="PacSci Perspectives" global_parent="7474" title="PacSci Perspectives" background_layout="dark" text_orientation="left" header_fullscreen="off" header_scroll_down="off" content_orientation="center" image_orientation="center" subhead_font="|on|||" custom_button_one="off" button_one_icon_placement="right" custom_button_two="off" button_two_icon_placement="right" title_text_color="#ffffff" subhead_text_color="#ffffff" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial" _builder_version="3.0.95" max_width_tablet="50px" /][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section"][et_pb_row admin_label="row" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" _builder_version="3.0.51" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][et_pb_post_title admin_label="Post Title - DON'T EDIT THIS" title="on" meta="on" author="on" date="on" categories="off" comments="off" featured_image="off" featured_placement="below" parallax_effect="on" parallax_method="off" text_orientation="left" text_color="dark" text_background="off" module_bg_color="rgba(255,255,255,0)" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.51" parallax="on" background_color="rgba(255,255,255,0)" /][et_pb_text admin_label="Body of Story - EDIT THIS IF NEED BE" background_layout="light" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.100"]

PacSci DIY: Squishy Circuits

With Mid-Winter Break, Spring Break, and Summer Camps just around the corner, here is a sneak peek of one of the many fun camp activities you can expect your camper to take part in.

Materials You Will Need for Squishy Circuits:

  • Play Dough
  • Battery Pack with Wire Leads (can be found in most electronic stores or online)
  • Mini LED Lights (can be found online)

Rather make your own Play Dough? Here's how:

  • 1 cup of flour
  • 1 cup of water
  • 2 teaspoons cream of tartar
  • 1/3 cup of salt
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil food coloring

Directions:

1. In a 2 quart saucepan, add 1 cup of flour, 2 teaspoons of cream of tartar, and 1/3 cup of salt.
2. Add 1 cup of water and 1 tablespoon of vegetable oil.
3. Turn your burner on medium/low and stir. It will be a little lumpy. That's okay.
4. Keep stirring until it starts getting a little solid. If there are still a few lumps, that's OK, you can work them out later. If your stove is already hot, this may only take 20-30 seconds, but it may take 2-3 minutes if it's still heating up.
4. Once it reaches that point, add the food coloring right away. It will be much easier to mix up if you do it now.
5. Stir in your food coloring.
6. Once the dough starts gathering together around the spoon you know it's done.
7. Remove your homemade Play Dough from the saucepan and put it on some waxed paper or a plate to cool.

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Embedded Youtube video - Text" background_layout="light" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.100"]

https://youtu.be/5ysnmv3-qcw

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" _builder_version="3.0.51" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

The post PacSci DIY: Camps Edition Squishy Circuits appeared first on Pacific Science Center.

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[et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" fullwidth="on" specialty="off" background_image="https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/header-ethernet-cables-1280x2921.jpg" transparent_background="off" allow_player_pause="off" inner_shadow="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" padding_mobile="off" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" make_equal="off" use_custom_gutter="off" custom_padding_tablet="50px|0|50px|0" custom_padding_last_edited="on|desktop" global_module="7474"][et_pb_fullwidth_header admin_label="PacSci Perspectives" global_parent="7474" title="PacSci Perspectives" background_layout="dark" text_orientation="left" header_fullscreen="off" header_scroll_down="off" content_orientation="center" image_orientation="center" subhead_font="|on|||" custom_button_one="off" button_one_icon_placement="right" custom_button_two="off" button_two_icon_placement="right" title_text_color="#ffffff" subhead_text_color="#ffffff" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial" _builder_version="3.0.95" max_width_tablet="50px" /][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section"][et_pb_row admin_label="row" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" _builder_version="3.0.51" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][et_pb_post_title admin_label="Post Title - DON'T EDIT THIS" title="on" meta="on" author="on" date="on" categories="off" comments="off" featured_image="off" featured_placement="below" parallax_effect="on" parallax_method="off" text_orientation="left" text_color="dark" text_background="off" module_bg_color="rgba(255,255,255,0)" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.51" parallax="on" background_color="rgba(255,255,255,0)" /][et_pb_text admin_label="Body of Story - EDIT THIS IF NEED BE" background_layout="light" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.100"] PacSci DIY: Squishy Circuits With Mid-Winter Break, Spring Break, and Summer Camps just around the corner, here is a sneak peek of one of the many fun camp activities you can expect your camper to take part in. Materials You Will Need for Squishy Circuits:
  • Play Dough
  • Battery Pack with Wire Leads (can be found in most electronic stores or online)
  • Mini LED Lights (can be found online)
Rather make your own Play Dough? Here's how:
  • 1 cup of flour
  • 1 cup of water
  • 2 teaspoons cream of tartar
  • 1/3 cup of salt
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil food coloring
Directions: 1. In a 2 quart saucepan, add 1 cup of flour, 2 teaspoons of cream of tartar, and 1/3 cup of salt. 2. Add 1 cup of water and 1 tablespoon of vegetable oil. 3. Turn your burner on medium/low and stir. It will be a little lumpy. That's okay. 4. Keep stirring until it starts getting a little solid. If there are still a few lumps, that's OK, you can work them out later. If your stove is already hot, this may only take 20-30 seconds, but it may take 2-3 minutes if it's still heating up. 4. Once it reaches that point, add the food coloring right away. It will be much easier to mix up if you do it now. 5. Stir in your food coloring. 6. Once the dough starts gathering together around the spoon you know it's done. 7. Remove your homemade Play Dough from the saucepan and put it on some waxed paper or a plate to cool. [/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Embedded Youtube video - Text" background_layout="light" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.100"] https://youtu.be/5ysnmv3-qcw [/et_pb_text][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" _builder_version="3.0.51" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

The post PacSci DIY: Camps Edition Squishy Circuits appeared first on Pacific Science Center.

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Uncovering The Secrets And Behaviors Of Narwhals And Polar Bears https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/pacsci-stories/uncovering-the-secrets-and-behaviors-of-narwhals-and-polar-bears-2018-02-05/ Mon, 05 Feb 2018 20:29:43 +0000 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/?p=22501 Kristin Laidre

[et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" fullwidth="on" specialty="off" background_image="https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/header-ethernet-cables-1280x2921.jpg" transparent_background="off" allow_player_pause="off" inner_shadow="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" padding_mobile="off" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" make_equal="off" use_custom_gutter="off" custom_padding_tablet="50px|0|50px|0" custom_padding_last_edited="on|desktop" global_module="7474"][et_pb_fullwidth_header admin_label="PacSci Perspectives" global_parent="7474" title="PacSci Perspectives" background_layout="dark" text_orientation="left" header_fullscreen="off" header_scroll_down="off" content_orientation="center" image_orientation="center" subhead_font="|on|||" custom_button_one="off" button_one_icon_placement="right" custom_button_two="off" button_two_icon_placement="right" title_text_color="#ffffff" subhead_text_color="#ffffff" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial" _builder_version="3.0.95" max_width_tablet="50px" /][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section"][et_pb_row admin_label="row" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" _builder_version="3.0.51" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][et_pb_post_title admin_label="Post Title Module - DON'T EDIT THIS" title="on" meta="on" author="off" date="off" categories="off" comments="off" featured_image="off" featured_placement="below" parallax_effect="on" text_color="dark" text_background="off" module_bg_color="rgba(255,255,255,0)" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.100" custom_margin="||0px|" custom_padding="||0px|" /][et_pb_text admin_label="Byline - Text" background_layout="light" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.100" custom_margin="0px|||" custom_padding="0px|||"]

By Kristin Laidre, Ph.D., University of Washington Polar Science Center

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Body of Story - Text" background_layout="light" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.100"]

Kristin Laidre

I did not set out to study whales - for most of my early life I thought I would be a ballerina. I grew up near landlocked Saratoga Springs, New York, and trained throughout my teens to be an elite dancer. After high school, I trained and danced with the Pacific Northwest Ballet until a foot injury put an end to my dancing days.

I received my Ph.D. at the University of Washington (UW) from the School of Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences (SAFS) and then worked as a post-doctoral fellow at the Greenland Institute of Natural Resources in Nuuk. Now, I work as a principal scientist at the Polar Science Center at UW and as an assistant professor at SAFS. I study Arctic animals, in particular the narwhal (an elusive whale species whose long spiraled tooth gave rise to the myth of the unicorn) and the polar bear. Over the course of my career, I have participated in over 30 field expeditions to both coasts of Greenland. Greenland is a stunningly beautiful place, full of interesting people and wildlife.

Narwhals eat the fish that live on the ocean floor beneath the sea ice and they can dive almost a mile deep to get their food. They hold their breath for half an hour and find open places in the ice to come up and breathe. One focus of my work has been to track the migration of narwhals. This involves setting up whale-sized nets in the water near an onshore camp. When we catch a narwhal, we raise it out of the water so it can breathe and quickly fasten a satellite transmitter to its back before it is sent on its way. The transmitters send data on the whale's location, depth and water temperature to satellites. This information teaches us not only about the narwhals, but also about the changing oceans in which they live.

Sea ice loss in the Arctic may mean big changes for narwhals. What type of changes? We don't know all of the answers yet. We do know the narwhal is one of the few Arctic whales and the sea ice is its home. We hope to learn more to be able to understand how this interesting animal will adapt to changes in the Arctic.

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Callout Box for 2018 Polar Sci Weekend" background_layout="light" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.100"] [box]

Explore the ends of the earth with us! Learn about our unique polar regions and how they help us understand the effects of climate change at Curiosity Days: Polar Science Weekend, March 2-4. Discover why understanding our Arctic and Antarctic regions are crucial to uncovering the continuous changing climate on earth through hands-on activities, demonstrations and presentations from local researchers.

[/box] [/et_pb_text][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" _builder_version="3.0.51" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

The post Uncovering The Secrets And Behaviors Of Narwhals And Polar Bears appeared first on Pacific Science Center.

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[et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" fullwidth="on" specialty="off" background_image="https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/header-ethernet-cables-1280x2921.jpg" transparent_background="off" allow_player_pause="off" inner_shadow="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" padding_mobile="off" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" make_equal="off" use_custom_gutter="off" custom_padding_tablet="50px|0|50px|0" custom_padding_last_edited="on|desktop" global_module="7474"][et_pb_fullwidth_header admin_label="PacSci Perspectives" global_parent="7474" title="PacSci Perspectives" background_layout="dark" text_orientation="left" header_fullscreen="off" header_scroll_down="off" content_orientation="center" image_orientation="center" subhead_font="|on|||" custom_button_one="off" button_one_icon_placement="right" custom_button_two="off" button_two_icon_placement="right" title_text_color="#ffffff" subhead_text_color="#ffffff" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial" _builder_version="3.0.95" max_width_tablet="50px" /][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section"][et_pb_row admin_label="row" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" _builder_version="3.0.51" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][et_pb_post_title admin_label="Post Title Module - DON'T EDIT THIS" title="on" meta="on" author="off" date="off" categories="off" comments="off" featured_image="off" featured_placement="below" parallax_effect="on" text_color="dark" text_background="off" module_bg_color="rgba(255,255,255,0)" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.100" custom_margin="||0px|" custom_padding="||0px|" /][et_pb_text admin_label="Byline - Text" background_layout="light" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.100" custom_margin="0px|||" custom_padding="0px|||"] By Kristin Laidre, Ph.D., University of Washington Polar Science Center [/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Body of Story - Text" background_layout="light" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.100"] Kristin Laidre I did not set out to study whales - for most of my early life I thought I would be a ballerina. I grew up near landlocked Saratoga Springs, New York, and trained throughout my teens to be an elite dancer. After high school, I trained and danced with the Pacific Northwest Ballet until a foot injury put an end to my dancing days. I received my Ph.D. at the University of Washington (UW) from the School of Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences (SAFS) and then worked as a post-doctoral fellow at the Greenland Institute of Natural Resources in Nuuk. Now, I work as a principal scientist at the Polar Science Center at UW and as an assistant professor at SAFS. I study Arctic animals, in particular the narwhal (an elusive whale species whose long spiraled tooth gave rise to the myth of the unicorn) and the polar bear. Over the course of my career, I have participated in over 30 field expeditions to both coasts of Greenland. Greenland is a stunningly beautiful place, full of interesting people and wildlife. Narwhals eat the fish that live on the ocean floor beneath the sea ice and they can dive almost a mile deep to get their food. They hold their breath for half an hour and find open places in the ice to come up and breathe. One focus of my work has been to track the migration of narwhals. This involves setting up whale-sized nets in the water near an onshore camp. When we catch a narwhal, we raise it out of the water so it can breathe and quickly fasten a satellite transmitter to its back before it is sent on its way. The transmitters send data on the whale's location, depth and water temperature to satellites. This information teaches us not only about the narwhals, but also about the changing oceans in which they live. Sea ice loss in the Arctic may mean big changes for narwhals. What type of changes? We don't know all of the answers yet. We do know the narwhal is one of the few Arctic whales and the sea ice is its home. We hope to learn more to be able to understand how this interesting animal will adapt to changes in the Arctic. [/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Callout Box for 2018 Polar Sci Weekend" background_layout="light" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.100"] [box] Explore the ends of the earth with us! Learn about our unique polar regions and how they help us understand the effects of climate change at Curiosity Days: Polar Science Weekend, March 2-4. Discover why understanding our Arctic and Antarctic regions are crucial to uncovering the continuous changing climate on earth through hands-on activities, demonstrations and presentations from local researchers. [/box] [/et_pb_text][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" _builder_version="3.0.51" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

The post Uncovering The Secrets And Behaviors Of Narwhals And Polar Bears appeared first on Pacific Science Center.

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Fresh Sheet – February 3, 2018 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/life-sciences-blog/fresh-sheet-2018-02-03/ Sat, 03 Feb 2018 08:01:26 +0000 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/?p=22477 Troides helena (Common Birdwing)

[et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" fullwidth="on" specialty="off" background_image="https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/header-ethernet-cables-1280x2921.jpg" transparent_background="off" allow_player_pause="off" inner_shadow="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" padding_mobile="off" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" make_equal="off" use_custom_gutter="off" custom_padding_tablet="50px|0|50px|0" custom_padding_last_edited="on|desktop" global_module="7474"][et_pb_fullwidth_header admin_label="PacSci Perspectives" global_parent="7474" title="PacSci Perspectives" background_layout="dark" text_orientation="left" header_fullscreen="off" header_scroll_down="off" content_orientation="center" image_orientation="center" subhead_font="|on|||" custom_button_one="off" button_one_icon_placement="right" custom_button_two="off" button_two_icon_placement="right" title_text_color="#ffffff" subhead_text_color="#ffffff" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial" _builder_version="3.0.95" max_width_tablet="50px" /][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section"][et_pb_row admin_label="row" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][et_pb_post_title admin_label="Post Title - DON'T EDIT THIS" title="on" meta="on" author="on" date="on" categories="off" comments="off" featured_image="off" featured_placement="below" parallax_effect="on" parallax_method="off" text_orientation="left" text_color="dark" text_background="off" text_bg_color="rgba(255,255,255,0.9)" module_bg_color="rgba(255,255,255,0)" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" parallax="on" background_color="rgba(255,255,255,0)" /][et_pb_text admin_label="Body of Page - Text" background_layout="light" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.100"]

[caption id="attachment_22478" align="alignnone" width="1920"]Troides helena (Common Birdwing) Troides helena (Common Birdwing), one of the largest butterflies, comes from the Indomalaya ecozone.[/caption]

There are giants among us! And they will soon be flying in our Tropical Butterfly House. In addition to the often seen giant of the butterfly house, the Atlas Moth (Attacus atlas), this week's shipment will feature another very large species of butterfly, theĀ Troides helena (Common Birdwing), a member of the Swallowtail Family. There are approximately 36 species of Birdwing butterfly, including the largest butterfly in the world, Ornithoptera alexandrae (Queen Alexandra's Birdwing). That Birdwing species competes with our Atlas Moths, both reaching wingspans of up to 25cm (9.8 inches)! Troides helena typically reaches between 13-17cm, so it isn't as large as its cousin, but still a dramatic butterfly to view. Can you spot this species in our Tropical Butterfly House? Do you see how it got the name "Birdwing" from its bird-like flight? Please visit soon.

Penang Butterfly Farm
Malaysia

40 - Attacus atlas (Atlas Moth)
10 - Catopsilia scylla (Orange Emigrant)
70 - Cethosia cyane (Leopard Lacewing)
10 - Euploea phaenareta (Great Crow)
70 - Idea leuconoe (Paper Kite)
20 - Lexias dirtea (Archduke)
80 - Parthenos sylvia (The Clipper)
10 - Precis atlites (Gray Pansy)
20 - Tirumala septentrionis (Dark Blue Tiger)
10 - Troides helena (Common Birdwing)
60 - Vindula dejone (The Cruiser)

Total = 400

 

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Boilerplate material - Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"]

"Fresh Sheet" is our weekly shipment report of pupae on display in the emerging window. Visit Pacific Science Center's Tropical Butterfly House and meet our newest residents.

These butterflies typically arrive as pupae on the Thursday or Friday before the Fresh Sheet is published. Some of these butterflies will start emerging the day they arrive or the next day, but other species may take a full week before they reach adulthood. After emerging, they may live for a week or even a few months! While we love sharing a variety of species with our guests, we cannot guarantee that any specific species will be flying on the day that you visit Pacific Science Center.

If you are interested in photographing a specific butterfly and would like to be updated about when it is flying in the Tropical Butterfly House, please email Butterflies@pacsci.org with details and your contact information.

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

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[et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" fullwidth="on" specialty="off" background_image="https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/header-ethernet-cables-1280x2921.jpg" transparent_background="off" allow_player_pause="off" inner_shadow="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" padding_mobile="off" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" make_equal="off" use_custom_gutter="off" custom_padding_tablet="50px|0|50px|0" custom_padding_last_edited="on|desktop" global_module="7474"][et_pb_fullwidth_header admin_label="PacSci Perspectives" global_parent="7474" title="PacSci Perspectives" background_layout="dark" text_orientation="left" header_fullscreen="off" header_scroll_down="off" content_orientation="center" image_orientation="center" subhead_font="|on|||" custom_button_one="off" button_one_icon_placement="right" custom_button_two="off" button_two_icon_placement="right" title_text_color="#ffffff" subhead_text_color="#ffffff" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial" _builder_version="3.0.95" max_width_tablet="50px" /][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section"][et_pb_row admin_label="row" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][et_pb_post_title admin_label="Post Title - DON'T EDIT THIS" title="on" meta="on" author="on" date="on" categories="off" comments="off" featured_image="off" featured_placement="below" parallax_effect="on" parallax_method="off" text_orientation="left" text_color="dark" text_background="off" text_bg_color="rgba(255,255,255,0.9)" module_bg_color="rgba(255,255,255,0)" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" parallax="on" background_color="rgba(255,255,255,0)" /][et_pb_text admin_label="Body of Page - Text" background_layout="light" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.100"] [caption id="attachment_22478" align="alignnone" width="1920"]Troides helena (Common Birdwing) Troides helena (Common Birdwing), one of the largest butterflies, comes from the Indomalaya ecozone.[/caption] There are giants among us! And they will soon be flying in our Tropical Butterfly House. In addition to the often seen giant of the butterfly house, the Atlas Moth (Attacus atlas), this week's shipment will feature another very large species of butterfly, theĀ Troides helena (Common Birdwing), a member of the Swallowtail Family. There are approximately 36 species of Birdwing butterfly, including the largest butterfly in the world, Ornithoptera alexandrae (Queen Alexandra's Birdwing). That Birdwing species competes with our Atlas Moths, both reaching wingspans of up to 25cm (9.8 inches)! Troides helena typically reaches between 13-17cm, so it isn't as large as its cousin, but still a dramatic butterfly to view. Can you spot this species in our Tropical Butterfly House? Do you see how it got the name "Birdwing" from its bird-like flight? Please visit soon. Penang Butterfly Farm Malaysia 40 - Attacus atlas (Atlas Moth) 10 - Catopsilia scylla (Orange Emigrant) 70 - Cethosia cyane (Leopard Lacewing) 10 - Euploea phaenareta (Great Crow) 70 - Idea leuconoe (Paper Kite) 20 - Lexias dirtea (Archduke) 80 - Parthenos sylvia (The Clipper) 10 - Precis atlites (Gray Pansy) 20 - Tirumala septentrionis (Dark Blue Tiger) 10 - Troides helena (Common Birdwing) 60 - Vindula dejone (The Cruiser) Total = 400   [/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Boilerplate material - Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"] "Fresh Sheet" is our weekly shipment report of pupae on display in the emerging window. Visit Pacific Science Center's Tropical Butterfly House and meet our newest residents. These butterflies typically arrive as pupae on the Thursday or Friday before the Fresh Sheet is published. Some of these butterflies will start emerging the day they arrive or the next day, but other species may take a full week before they reach adulthood. After emerging, they may live for a week or even a few months! While we love sharing a variety of species with our guests, we cannot guarantee that any specific species will be flying on the day that you visit Pacific Science Center. If you are interested in photographing a specific butterfly and would like to be updated about when it is flying in the Tropical Butterfly House, please email Butterflies@pacsci.org with details and your contact information. [/et_pb_text][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

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Summer Camps: A Mid-Winter Summer Tradition from Pacific Science Center https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/pacsci-podcast/summer-camps-a-mid-winter-summer-tradition-from-pacific-science-center/ Fri, 02 Feb 2018 20:58:25 +0000 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/?p=22460 2018 Camps for Curious Minds

[et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" fullwidth="on" specialty="off" background_image="https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/header-ethernet-cables-1280x2921.jpg" transparent_background="off" allow_player_pause="off" inner_shadow="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" padding_mobile="off" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" make_equal="off" use_custom_gutter="off" custom_padding_tablet="50px|0|50px|0" custom_padding_last_edited="on|desktop" global_module="7474"][et_pb_fullwidth_header admin_label="PacSci Perspectives" global_parent="7474" title="PacSci Perspectives" background_layout="dark" text_orientation="left" header_fullscreen="off" header_scroll_down="off" content_orientation="center" image_orientation="center" subhead_font="|on|||" custom_button_one="off" button_one_icon_placement="right" custom_button_two="off" button_two_icon_placement="right" title_text_color="#ffffff" subhead_text_color="#ffffff" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial" _builder_version="3.0.95" max_width_tablet="50px" /][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section"][et_pb_row admin_label="row" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" _builder_version="3.0.51" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][et_pb_post_title admin_label="Post Title - DON'T EDIT THIS" title="on" meta="on" author="on" date="on" categories="off" comments="off" featured_image="off" featured_placement="below" parallax_effect="on" parallax_method="on" text_orientation="left" text_color="dark" text_background="off" module_bg_color="rgba(255,255,255,0)" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.51" parallax="on" background_color="rgba(255,255,255,0)" /][et_pb_text admin_label="Image - Text" background_layout="light" _builder_version="3.0.100"]

2018 Camps for Curious Minds

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Body of Story - EDIT THIS IF NEED BE" background_layout="light" _builder_version="3.0.100"]

 

It may be winter, but now is the time to be making plans for summer camps. As we hear in this quick PacSci Podcast, camps this year are more fascinating and more popular than ever. Learn More

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Embedded Podcast - Text" background_layout="light" _builder_version="3.0.100"]

https://soundcloud.com/pacsci/a-mid-winter-summer-tradition-2018-02-02

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" _builder_version="3.0.51" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

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[et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" fullwidth="on" specialty="off" background_image="https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/header-ethernet-cables-1280x2921.jpg" transparent_background="off" allow_player_pause="off" inner_shadow="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" padding_mobile="off" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" make_equal="off" use_custom_gutter="off" custom_padding_tablet="50px|0|50px|0" custom_padding_last_edited="on|desktop" global_module="7474"][et_pb_fullwidth_header admin_label="PacSci Perspectives" global_parent="7474" title="PacSci Perspectives" background_layout="dark" text_orientation="left" header_fullscreen="off" header_scroll_down="off" content_orientation="center" image_orientation="center" subhead_font="|on|||" custom_button_one="off" button_one_icon_placement="right" custom_button_two="off" button_two_icon_placement="right" title_text_color="#ffffff" subhead_text_color="#ffffff" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial" _builder_version="3.0.95" max_width_tablet="50px" /][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section"][et_pb_row admin_label="row" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" _builder_version="3.0.51" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][et_pb_post_title admin_label="Post Title - DON'T EDIT THIS" title="on" meta="on" author="on" date="on" categories="off" comments="off" featured_image="off" featured_placement="below" parallax_effect="on" parallax_method="on" text_orientation="left" text_color="dark" text_background="off" module_bg_color="rgba(255,255,255,0)" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.51" parallax="on" background_color="rgba(255,255,255,0)" /][et_pb_text admin_label="Image - Text" background_layout="light" _builder_version="3.0.100"] 2018 Camps for Curious Minds [/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Body of Story - EDIT THIS IF NEED BE" background_layout="light" _builder_version="3.0.100"]   It may be winter, but now is the time to be making plans for summer camps. As we hear in this quick PacSci Podcast, camps this year are more fascinating and more popular than ever. Learn More [/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Embedded Podcast - Text" background_layout="light" _builder_version="3.0.100"] https://soundcloud.com/pacsci/a-mid-winter-summer-tradition-2018-02-02 [/et_pb_text][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" _builder_version="3.0.51" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

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Camps for Curious Minds: A Summer Experience Worth Repeating https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/pacsci-stories/camps-for-curious-minds-a-summer-experience-worth-repeating-2018-02-02/ Fri, 02 Feb 2018 16:32:46 +0000 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/?p=22452 Happy Camper

[et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" fullwidth="on" specialty="off" background_image="https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/header-ethernet-cables-1280x2921.jpg" transparent_background="off" allow_player_pause="off" inner_shadow="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" padding_mobile="off" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" make_equal="off" use_custom_gutter="off" custom_padding_tablet="50px|0|50px|0" custom_padding_last_edited="on|desktop" global_module="7474"][et_pb_fullwidth_header admin_label="PacSci Perspectives" global_parent="7474" title="PacSci Perspectives" background_layout="dark" text_orientation="left" header_fullscreen="off" header_scroll_down="off" content_orientation="center" image_orientation="center" subhead_font="|on|||" custom_button_one="off" button_one_icon_placement="right" custom_button_two="off" button_two_icon_placement="right" title_text_color="#ffffff" subhead_text_color="#ffffff" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial" _builder_version="3.0.95" max_width_tablet="50px" /][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section"][et_pb_row admin_label="row" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" _builder_version="3.0.51" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][et_pb_post_title admin_label="Post Title - DON'T EDIT THIS" title="on" meta="on" author="on" date="on" categories="off" comments="off" featured_image="off" featured_placement="below" parallax_effect="on" parallax_method="off" text_orientation="left" text_color="dark" text_background="off" module_bg_color="rgba(255,255,255,0)" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.51" parallax="on" background_color="rgba(255,255,255,0)" /][et_pb_text admin_label="Body of Story - EDIT THIS IF NEED BE" background_layout="light" _builder_version="3.0.100"]

Happy Camper

Every summer, Pacific Science Center's Camps for Curious Minds staff are excited when they see the familiar faces of campers who have joined in our camp program for years.

So what makes Camps for Curious Minds something kids want to return to every summer?

We asked a few of last summer's campers who attended multiple camps at a number of our locations throughout the greater Seattle area over the years and we heard the same fantastic story: Parents love the consistently high quality of our camps and the teachers that run them, and the convenience of our eight locations throughout the greater Seattle area. Here is some feedback we've received:

"My daughter really enjoyed the camps and seemed to get a lot out of it. She was so excited to tell us about her day (which usually never happens). We really appreciated the great communication from camp teachers about what the campers learned as well as the follow-up questions to ask our camper about what they learned. We went through the emails together as a family and it was great!"

"My kids LOVE the Pacific Science Center camps. I can't keep them quiet in the car ride home! They rave about the people and how much they learn."

"The quality of the camp teachers is unmatched. The camp is generally well-run, and staff have always been willing to work with me to reasonably accommodate my son's needs. This was my daughter's first year, and she had a blast. Staff responded well to her needs as well."

Along with our innovative themes, the quality of our camps has always been a highlight for parents, especially our teachers. Our enthusiastic, experienced and highly-trained camp teachers engage kids with hands-on activities and experiments to get them excited about the world around them because they are just as curious! We asked Jared, a current camp teacher, what inspired him to work at Pacific Science Center.

"I remember being at home watching Bill Nye, the Science Guy on TV and being so inspired. I knew right then I wanted to be a scientist."

As he grew up, Jared developed a passion for teaching, informal education in particular. After college, he moved to Seattle to teach for the Camps for Curious Minds program at Pacific Science Center.

Jared explains, "We have such a broad range of camps that if you have an interest, we probably have two camps on that science topic X at least! It gives campers the option to choose what they want to learn." Each weeklong camp is designed to spark each child's curiosity and motivate every camper to say, "I want to learn more."

Just ask Jenni Heuberger, whose eight-year-old son, Ian, attended Robotic Rangers, Cooking Up Science and Spy Science last summer while her five-year-old son, Charlie, roamed the wetlands of Mercer Slough Environmental Center in Bellevue in the Mud, Muck and Goo preschool camp. Jenni said, "With Pacific Science Center offering multiple weeks and locations to experience different camps, we could fit all the camps Ian wanted to do into his busy summer schedule."

This summer, Pacific Science Center is excited to unveil over 25 new camp themes for children in kindergarten through eighth grade, making our total camp themes surpass 90! We are proud to offer summer camps at eight locations in the greater Seattle area, including Seattle, Bellevue, Medina, Kirkland, Redmond, Bothell, Mountlake Terrace and West Seattle.

From the science of weather to computer programming, to animal dissection, we have a variety of brand new themes for campers to explore.

Technology is the focus of our newest camp themes, especially for middle school campers. Campers now have a variety of new opportunities to explore animation, computer programming, augmented and virtual reality, and so much more.

Jenni said, "My favorite part of these camps is that they teach so much information in a way that kids don't realize what sponges they are and how much they've learned until after the fact, when they are spouting facts and figures, putting things together, or in Ian's case, cooking us Saturday breakfast or building a solar-powered mini-car."

With new camp themes ranging from 3D Game Design to Dissection Lab and Exhibit Design, along with sensory-friendly camps, returning campers like Ian now have exciting new experiences to look forward to this summer.

Whether a camper wants to explore coding or crazy contraptions, Pacific Science Center summer camps offer unique and innovative learning experiences that will ignite their curiosity and fuel a passion for discovery, experimentation and critical thinking.

So; why do families return to Pacific Science Center camps summer after summer?

Jenni said it best: "We choose Camps for Curious Minds because they are stimulating to our kids' intellect and they are fun, exciting, safe, and always have a great 'take home' message."

And for Jared: "Being able to impact kids in such a profound way by igniting their curiosity - that's why I love working at the Science Center. Seeing the same expression from campers that I have when I think about science, I know that we're making a difference. This could change the course of their lives. If I hadn't seen Bill Nye, I might not be teaching here today. Who knows what these campers will go on to do!"

Camps for Curious Minds registration opens to the general public on February 8. Pacific Science Center Members get early, exclusive registration access on February 1. To become a Member and get priority summer camp registration access, click here. For more information on our Camps for Curious Minds and to download our Summer Camp Guide, click here.

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" _builder_version="3.0.51" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

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[et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" fullwidth="on" specialty="off" background_image="https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/header-ethernet-cables-1280x2921.jpg" transparent_background="off" allow_player_pause="off" inner_shadow="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" padding_mobile="off" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" make_equal="off" use_custom_gutter="off" custom_padding_tablet="50px|0|50px|0" custom_padding_last_edited="on|desktop" global_module="7474"][et_pb_fullwidth_header admin_label="PacSci Perspectives" global_parent="7474" title="PacSci Perspectives" background_layout="dark" text_orientation="left" header_fullscreen="off" header_scroll_down="off" content_orientation="center" image_orientation="center" subhead_font="|on|||" custom_button_one="off" button_one_icon_placement="right" custom_button_two="off" button_two_icon_placement="right" title_text_color="#ffffff" subhead_text_color="#ffffff" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial" _builder_version="3.0.95" max_width_tablet="50px" /][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section"][et_pb_row admin_label="row" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" _builder_version="3.0.51" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][et_pb_post_title admin_label="Post Title - DON'T EDIT THIS" title="on" meta="on" author="on" date="on" categories="off" comments="off" featured_image="off" featured_placement="below" parallax_effect="on" parallax_method="off" text_orientation="left" text_color="dark" text_background="off" module_bg_color="rgba(255,255,255,0)" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.51" parallax="on" background_color="rgba(255,255,255,0)" /][et_pb_text admin_label="Body of Story - EDIT THIS IF NEED BE" background_layout="light" _builder_version="3.0.100"] Happy Camper Every summer, Pacific Science Center's Camps for Curious Minds staff are excited when they see the familiar faces of campers who have joined in our camp program for years. So what makes Camps for Curious Minds something kids want to return to every summer? We asked a few of last summer's campers who attended multiple camps at a number of our locations throughout the greater Seattle area over the years and we heard the same fantastic story: Parents love the consistently high quality of our camps and the teachers that run them, and the convenience of our eight locations throughout the greater Seattle area. Here is some feedback we've received:
"My daughter really enjoyed the camps and seemed to get a lot out of it. She was so excited to tell us about her day (which usually never happens). We really appreciated the great communication from camp teachers about what the campers learned as well as the follow-up questions to ask our camper about what they learned. We went through the emails together as a family and it was great!"
"My kids LOVE the Pacific Science Center camps. I can't keep them quiet in the car ride home! They rave about the people and how much they learn."
"The quality of the camp teachers is unmatched. The camp is generally well-run, and staff have always been willing to work with me to reasonably accommodate my son's needs. This was my daughter's first year, and she had a blast. Staff responded well to her needs as well."
Along with our innovative themes, the quality of our camps has always been a highlight for parents, especially our teachers. Our enthusiastic, experienced and highly-trained camp teachers engage kids with hands-on activities and experiments to get them excited about the world around them because they are just as curious! We asked Jared, a current camp teacher, what inspired him to work at Pacific Science Center. "I remember being at home watching Bill Nye, the Science Guy on TV and being so inspired. I knew right then I wanted to be a scientist." As he grew up, Jared developed a passion for teaching, informal education in particular. After college, he moved to Seattle to teach for the Camps for Curious Minds program at Pacific Science Center. Jared explains, "We have such a broad range of camps that if you have an interest, we probably have two camps on that science topic X at least! It gives campers the option to choose what they want to learn." Each weeklong camp is designed to spark each child's curiosity and motivate every camper to say, "I want to learn more." Just ask Jenni Heuberger, whose eight-year-old son, Ian, attended Robotic Rangers, Cooking Up Science and Spy Science last summer while her five-year-old son, Charlie, roamed the wetlands of Mercer Slough Environmental Center in Bellevue in the Mud, Muck and Goo preschool camp. Jenni said, "With Pacific Science Center offering multiple weeks and locations to experience different camps, we could fit all the camps Ian wanted to do into his busy summer schedule." This summer, Pacific Science Center is excited to unveil over 25 new camp themes for children in kindergarten through eighth grade, making our total camp themes surpass 90! We are proud to offer summer camps at eight locations in the greater Seattle area, including Seattle, Bellevue, Medina, Kirkland, Redmond, Bothell, Mountlake Terrace and West Seattle. From the science of weather to computer programming, to animal dissection, we have a variety of brand new themes for campers to explore. Technology is the focus of our newest camp themes, especially for middle school campers. Campers now have a variety of new opportunities to explore animation, computer programming, augmented and virtual reality, and so much more. Jenni said, "My favorite part of these camps is that they teach so much information in a way that kids don't realize what sponges they are and how much they've learned until after the fact, when they are spouting facts and figures, putting things together, or in Ian's case, cooking us Saturday breakfast or building a solar-powered mini-car." With new camp themes ranging from 3D Game Design to Dissection Lab and Exhibit Design, along with sensory-friendly camps, returning campers like Ian now have exciting new experiences to look forward to this summer. Whether a camper wants to explore coding or crazy contraptions, Pacific Science Center summer camps offer unique and innovative learning experiences that will ignite their curiosity and fuel a passion for discovery, experimentation and critical thinking. So; why do families return to Pacific Science Center camps summer after summer? Jenni said it best: "We choose Camps for Curious Minds because they are stimulating to our kids' intellect and they are fun, exciting, safe, and always have a great 'take home' message." And for Jared: "Being able to impact kids in such a profound way by igniting their curiosity - that's why I love working at the Science Center. Seeing the same expression from campers that I have when I think about science, I know that we're making a difference. This could change the course of their lives. If I hadn't seen Bill Nye, I might not be teaching here today. Who knows what these campers will go on to do!" Camps for Curious Minds registration opens to the general public on February 8. Pacific Science Center Members get early, exclusive registration access on February 1. To become a Member and get priority summer camp registration access, click here. For more information on our Camps for Curious Minds and to download our Summer Camp Guide, click here. [/et_pb_text][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" _builder_version="3.0.51" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

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Volunteer Spotlight: Qianqian Chen https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/volunteer/volunteer-spotlight-qianqian-chen/ Mon, 29 Jan 2018 18:05:14 +0000 https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/?p=22324 Qianqian Chen

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Qianqian Chen

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Volunteering at Pacific Science center is both a unique opportunity and an integral part to our operations. We had a chat with Qianqian Chen, a college student working to become a nuclear physicist, to learn what makes volunteering at Pacific Science Center so rewarding.

1. How long have you been working at Pacific Science Center?

I started from the beginning of September as a Science Interpretation Volunteer.

2. Why did you decided to volunteer?

For me it's kind of a responsibility to give back something for the community no matter where you are. My first language is not English, but it is not about nationality, location or language, no matter where you are, for me it's a life achievement to help others.

3. What do you do at Pacific Science? What is a regular day here for you?

I do the expert interpretations to the visitors. They come from different areas or countries. I introduce the exhibits to them, initiate conversations and answer questions.

I finished my graduate school in China. Actually my background is in economy and accounting, not related with science, but I thought it would be really fun to be a volunteer here.

4. What is your favorite thing or place at Pacific Science Center?

I love to talk with the visitors, and once they learn something new I love the smile on their faces and the satisfaction they show. Sometimes they tell me "this is an amazing place" and I love it. It makes me feel that I helped others to understand this place well. And it's the same reason I volunteer, because I want to give something back to the community.

5. Is there something that has truly inspired, impressed or made you see things differently?

It is really important that this kind of organizations have an interpreter on the ground that communicates or interacts with the visitors. Sometimes guests may just come in and may not learn enough things, so this kind of interaction, especially for the kids, makes them more interested in science. The interpreter can provide extra bonus on the customer service.

6. Have you met someone that has truly inspired you here?

Yeah, I think people here are amazing. The staff and the other volunteers are so helpful and knowledgeable. They provide me the insights of the exhibits here and I learn a lot from them.

7. Is there a favorite moment or memory you have as a volunteer?

Yes. There was once when I was in the tide pool. I was shift in there for the last half an hour and when I arrived there I saw a little girl come and looked at the hermit crab so I told her she could touch it, and I showed her how to touch it using one finger nice and gentle. At first she did not want to, so I do it myself and then she began to do it. Then I told her she could pick it up and put it in her hand, and if she kept her hand still, the hermit crab may even come up. So I showed her and she really liked it, but when she pick it up the hermit crab did not want to come up, so she's a little bit sad. Then we put the hermit crab back in the water and I told her that if she keeps her hand still inside the water, and we don't move, the hermit crab may feel more safe and comfortable and might come up, so the little girl follows my instructions and finally the hermit crab came up, and she's so happy! And she played with the hermit crab until I leave! So this process made me feel that this is a good way to let visitors learn animal behavior and how they feel more comfortable and about respect. If we respect the animals, the animals will respect us. I think it's an unforgettable experience for me.

8. Would you recommend for others to volunteer at Pacific Science Center?

Yes! Of course! I've told a lot of my friends that I volunteer here, it is super fun!

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Looking for a rewarding and fulfilling volunteer opportunity in Seattle? Look no further than Pacific Science Center. We rely on volunteers and interns to help fulfill our mission to ignite curiosity in every child and fuel a passion for discovery, critical thinking, and experimentation in all of us. Learn More

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The post Volunteer Spotlight: Qianqian Chen appeared first on Pacific Science Center.

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[et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" fullwidth="on" specialty="off" background_image="https://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/header-ethernet-cables-1280x2921.jpg" transparent_background="off" allow_player_pause="off" inner_shadow="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" padding_mobile="off" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" make_equal="off" use_custom_gutter="off" custom_padding_tablet="50px|0|50px|0" custom_padding_last_edited="on|desktop" global_module="7474"][et_pb_fullwidth_header admin_label="PacSci Perspectives" global_parent="7474" title="PacSci Perspectives" background_layout="dark" text_orientation="left" header_fullscreen="off" header_scroll_down="off" content_orientation="center" image_orientation="center" subhead_font="|on|||" custom_button_one="off" button_one_icon_placement="right" custom_button_two="off" button_two_icon_placement="right" title_text_color="#ffffff" subhead_text_color="#ffffff" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial" _builder_version="3.0.95" max_width_tablet="50px" /][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section"][et_pb_row admin_label="row" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" _builder_version="3.0.51" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][et_pb_post_title admin_label="Post Title - DON'T EDIT THIS" title="on" meta="on" author="on" date="on" categories="off" comments="off" featured_image="off" featured_placement="below" parallax_effect="on" parallax_method="on" text_orientation="left" text_color="dark" text_background="off" module_bg_color="rgba(255,255,255,0)" border_style="solid" _builder_version="3.0.51" parallax="on" background_color="rgba(255,255,255,0)" /][et_pb_text admin_label="Featured Image - Text" background_layout="light" _builder_version="3.0.98"] Qianqian Chen [/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Body of Story - EDIT THIS IF NEED BE" background_layout="light" _builder_version="3.0.98"] Volunteering at Pacific Science center is both a unique opportunity and an integral part to our operations. We had a chat with Qianqian Chen, a college student working to become a nuclear physicist, to learn what makes volunteering at Pacific Science Center so rewarding. 1. How long have you been working at Pacific Science Center? I started from the beginning of September as a Science Interpretation Volunteer. 2. Why did you decided to volunteer? For me it's kind of a responsibility to give back something for the community no matter where you are. My first language is not English, but it is not about nationality, location or language, no matter where you are, for me it's a life achievement to help others. 3. What do you do at Pacific Science? What is a regular day here for you? I do the expert interpretations to the visitors. They come from different areas or countries. I introduce the exhibits to them, initiate conversations and answer questions. I finished my graduate school in China. Actually my background is in economy and accounting, not related with science, but I thought it would be really fun to be a volunteer here. 4. What is your favorite thing or place at Pacific Science Center? I love to talk with the visitors, and once they learn something new I love the smile on their faces and the satisfaction they show. Sometimes they tell me "this is an amazing place" and I love it. It makes me feel that I helped others to understand this place well. And it's the same reason I volunteer, because I want to give something back to the community. 5. Is there something that has truly inspired, impressed or made you see things differently? It is really important that this kind of organizations have an interpreter on the ground that communicates or interacts with the visitors. Sometimes guests may just come in and may not learn enough things, so this kind of interaction, especially for the kids, makes them more interested in science. The interpreter can provide extra bonus on the customer service. 6. Have you met someone that has truly inspired you here? Yeah, I think people here are amazing. The staff and the other volunteers are so helpful and knowledgeable. They provide me the insights of the exhibits here and I learn a lot from them. 7. Is there a favorite moment or memory you have as a volunteer? Yes. There was once when I was in the tide pool. I was shift in there for the last half an hour and when I arrived there I saw a little girl come and looked at the hermit crab so I told her she could touch it, and I showed her how to touch it using one finger nice and gentle. At first she did not want to, so I do it myself and then she began to do it. Then I told her she could pick it up and put it in her hand, and if she kept her hand still, the hermit crab may even come up. So I showed her and she really liked it, but when she pick it up the hermit crab did not want to come up, so she's a little bit sad. Then we put the hermit crab back in the water and I told her that if she keeps her hand still inside the water, and we don't move, the hermit crab may feel more safe and comfortable and might come up, so the little girl follows my instructions and finally the hermit crab came up, and she's so happy! And she played with the hermit crab until I leave! So this process made me feel that this is a good way to let visitors learn animal behavior and how they feel more comfortable and about respect. If we respect the animals, the animals will respect us. I think it's an unforgettable experience for me. 8. Would you recommend for others to volunteer at Pacific Science Center? Yes! Of course! I've told a lot of my friends that I volunteer here, it is super fun! [/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Boilerplate volunteer stuff - Text" background_layout="light" _builder_version="3.0.98"]  
Looking for a rewarding and fulfilling volunteer opportunity in Seattle? Look no further than Pacific Science Center. We rely on volunteers and interns to help fulfill our mission to ignite curiosity in every child and fuel a passion for discovery, critical thinking, and experimentation in all of us. Learn More [/et_pb_text][et_pb_code admin_label="Mobile Only Spacer - Code" _builder_version="3.0.51" disabled="off" disabled_on="|on|on"]<p>&nbsp;</p>[/et_pb_code][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

The post Volunteer Spotlight: Qianqian Chen appeared first on Pacific Science Center.

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