Exhibits & Programs

Science And A Movie

Pacific Science Center is excited to present our new Science And A Movie series in collaboration with Central Cinema. Explore research that is related to some of your favorite movies, with an introduction and post-screening discussion with local scientists.

This series is for all ages, with beer and wine available for guests 21 and over.

August tickets: central-cinema.com | $10 in advance, $12 at door

August 9 & 10 - Jurassic Park

Jurassic Park 
Runtime: 127 minutes | Rated: PG-13
Tuesday, August 9  and Wednesday, August 10

Located at: Central Cinema | 1411 21st Ave., Seattle

Science and a Movie: Jurassic Park with local scientists Lauren Saunders and Bish Paul
Presented as a collaboration between Pacific Science Center and Central Cinema

SCHEDULE | Event Time: 7 p.m.
Can scientists bring back extinct animals? Are there ways to design humans to have fewer diseases? Life finds a way. Learn about the rapidly evolving technique of gene editing with local biologists Lauren Saunders and Bish Paul, followed by a screening of the epic dino-adventure, Jurassic Park. Following the film, enjoy a discussion with the scientists and participate in a lively Q&A that will be moderated by Dr. Marley Jarvis of Pacific Science Center.

About The Film:
In Steven Spielberg’s massive blockbuster, paleontologists Alan Grant (Sam Neill) and Ellie Sattler (Laura Dern) and mathematician Ian Malcolm (Jeff Goldblum) are among a select group chosen to tour an island theme park populated by dinosaurs created from prehistoric DNA. While the park’s mastermind, billionaire John Hammond (Richard Attenborough), assures everyone that the facility is safe, they find out otherwise when various ferocious predators break free and go on the hunt.

About the Scientists:
Lauren Saunders is a Pacific Science Center Science Communication Fellow and a Ph.D. student at University of Washington in the Molecular and Cellular Biology Program. She uses a technique called “next-generation sequencing” along with zebrafish as a model organism to help her study how adult stem cells differentiate or become their specific cell type. Lauren uses modern gene editing techniques in her work and will talk about the recent scientific advances and the possibility of bringing extinct animals back to life, including the woolly mammoth and the dodo bird. Current de-extinction efforts are aimed at reviving biodiversity and global ecological health.

Bish Paul is a Pacific Science Center Science Communication Fellow, scientist and community leader; his work straddles science, education and outreach and LGBTQ advocacy. Bish hopes to make a significant difference in the emerging field of HIV Cure research using gene editing. He engineers T-cells so that they are resistant to HIV entry and subsequent infection in humans. In his presentation, Bish will explain how modern gene editing techniques work and challenge the audience to think about the future ethical implications of this technology.

Tickets: central-cinema.com | $10 in advance, $12 at door

Like us on Facebook and also visit Central Cinema’s event page to see who is coming. Like, share and invite your friends and family – it’s an event you won’t want to miss!

More info: scienceandamovie@pacsci.org

June 28 & 29 - Anaconda

Anaconda

Runtime: 89 minutes | Rated: PG-13
Tuesday, June 28 and Wednesday June 29

Located at: Central Cinema | 1411 21st Ave., Seattle

Science and a Movie: Anaconda with local scientists Dr. Rory Telemeco and Leonard Jones
Presented as a collaboration between Pacific Science Center and Central Cinema

SCHEDULE | Event Time: 7 p.m.
Local herpetologists Leonard Jones and Dr. Rory Telemeco join the fabulous J-Lo and Ice Cube to bring you a Science and a Movie snake night special at Central Cinema. Rory and Leonard will share cool facts about snakes before hitting the riverboat adventure Anaconda in Hecklevision, where your texts become subtitles.

The Q&A and discussion with the Herpetologists will be moderated by Dr. Marley Jarvis of Pacific Science Center.

About The Film:
Filmmaker Terri Flores (Jennifer Lopez) is traveling deep in the Amazon jungle looking for a forgotten tribe. Terri and her crew, which includes an anthropologist (Eric Stoltz) and a cameraman (Ice Cube), come across Paul (Jon Voight), who is stranded on the riverbank. He offers to help them find the tribe, but his secretive behavior puts everyone on edge. They realize too late that he’s using them to find a legendary anaconda that’s worth a fortune—If they can catch it.

About the Scientists:
Leonard Jones is a 3rd year Ph.D candidate at the University of Washington from New York City by way of Texas. His dissertation work focuses on genetic differences between island populations of WA’s three garter snake species. Additionally, he seeks to figure out the relationship between evolutionary history and color pattern differences between populations of the common garter snake, which is found throughout North America. He has loved snakes since childhood, saw Anaconda in the theaters as a kid, and is still confused by the snakes’ excited shrieks.

Rory Telemeco is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Washington. Rory’s research examines how the ecology and evolution of reptiles is affected by global change, both past and present. Rory has researched numerous snake, lizard, and turtle species across the United States, Central America, and Australia, and has loved all manner of scaly creatures for as long as he can remember (no joke: his earliest memory features a snapping turtle prominently).  He became fascinated with the movie, Anaconda, while working at the Oklahoma City Zoo, where he observed people of all ages surprisingly terrified by the 13’ green anaconda on display, apparently because of their aptitude to eat people not once, but twice.

Tickets: central-cinema.com | $11 in advance, $13 at door
Buy tickets HERE for Tuesday, June 28.
Buy tickets HERE for Wednesday, June 29.

Like us on Facebook and also visit Central Cinema’s event page to see who is coming. Like, share and invite your friends and family – it’s an event you won’t want to miss!

More info: scienceandamovie@pacsci.org

March 23 & 24 - The Fifth Element

The Fifth Element
Runtime: 127 minutes | Rated: PG-13
Located at: Central Cinema | 1411 21st Ave., Seattle

With local scientists Dr. Regina Carns and Eddie Schweiterman
Presented as a collaboration between Pacific Science Center and Central Cinema

SCHEDULE | Event Time: 8 p.m.
Talk about the science involved in the world of The Fifth Element, followed by a screening of the sci-fi favorite. Be joined with local Astrobiologists, Eddie Schwieterman and Dr. Regina Carns, to answer all of the questions you as an audience have, and to explore how scientists’ search for habitable exoplanets and extraterrestrial intelligence.

The Q&A and discussion with the Astrobiologists will be moderated by Dr. Marley Jarvis of Pacific Science Center.

About The Film:
In the 23rd century, a New York City cabbie, Korben Dallas (Bruce Willis), finds the fate of the world in his hands when Leeloo (Milla Jovovich) falls into his cab. As the embodiment of the fifth element, Leeloo needs to combine with the other four to keep the approaching Great Evil from destroying the world. Together with Father Vito Cornelius (Ian Holm) and zany broadcaster Ruby Rhod (Chris Tucker), Dallas must race against time and the wicked industrialist Zorg (Gary Oldman) to save humanity.

Like us on Facebook and also visit Central Cinema’s event page to see who is coming. Like, share and invite your friends and family – it’s an event you won’t want to miss!

Tickets to this event are SOLD OUT. $10 in advance | $12 at door.

Eternal Sunshine Of The Spotless Mind - Audience Q&A

Q: What do we know about how emotion affects memory? –Anonymous

A: Evolutionary speaking, our brain is designed have us survive, and we are going to remember those things that will keep us alive longer. Strong negative emotions are intricately involved in leaving stronger memories because you are more likely to going to survive if that memory is intact. If you look into your experience, those things that threaten your survival, leave more lasting memories than memories that involved emotions such as love or joy. Love and joy, while really great, aren’t really needed for survival, which is why you need other memory triggers (i.e. pictures, letters) to keep those memories alive. – Dr. Terri Gilbert

A: When a memory has a strong emotional component, we link together the parts of the brain encoding the specific details of the memory with other parts of the brain that encode emotional information. The more brains cells linked together in a memory, the stronger it becomes. – Dr. Adam Lesiak

Q: Is the “un-noticed” event seen: not present in the brain, or merely not consciously retrievable? –Anonymous

A: Un-noticed events are often present and not retrieved, that is mostly how magicians fool you. If you watch the first episode of Deception with Keith Barry, you’ll see him asking people to guess what color and pattern of tie he is holding under the table, and they are astounded to guess correctly. He explains that a blue car with white polka dots drove by just as he was asking the question, and they saw, and registered without being consciously being aware of the pattern he’d planted in their minds. – Dr. Terri Gilbert

Q: Does neural interactions create consciousness or does consciousness create neural pathways? –Lauren W.

A: One current theory is that consciousness is a fundamental property of complexity, so it’s not the interactions themselves, but the sheer mass of them that has consciousness happen. – Dr. Terri Gilbert

Q: Why is smell the strongest memory trigger? – Christina

A: It is not fully known exactly why this is the case, but there are a few theories behind this phenomenon. The one I am most familiar with is that the strong connection between smell and memory is leftover from our evolutionary past as a prey species. If you’re going to survive in the wild it is better to recognize, remember, and avoid the smell of a predator than to have to see or hear the predator. – Dr. Adam Lesiak

Q: How plausible is the movie to real life? –Catlin and Jed

A: Memories are made up of the intricate connections between thousands and thousands of connections between thousands and thousands of different brain cells. The technology required to know precisely which brain cells carry a specific memory, and then to have the ability to destroy those specific brain cells without drastically destroying other memories is going to take magnificent feats of engineering. Additionally, memories are changed, modified and interconnected to other memories so the chances that we could destroy a single memory is not likely. – Dr. Adam Lesiak

Q: What chemical process occurs during heart break? –Luna Alvarez

A: Interestingly, the brain cell activity patterns that occur during heartbreak overlap significantly with the brain cell activity patterns that occur during physical pain. Some of the chemical signals are likely to be very similar, but the details are not well understood. – Dr. Adam Lesiak

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